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Holy Language Institute @holylanguage

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  • website: https://www.facebook.com/HolyLanguage/
  • bio: Experience Hebrew with us, from a Yeshua-centred perspective, at holylanguage.com. (I'm Chris, the volunteer meeting your Instaneeds 😉)
  • number of photos: 1725
  • followed by: 17108
 
 

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Streetwise Hebrew: For the Love of All Things Short⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (via tlv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ So you’re shopping around for a short-sleeved shirt, and stop for an espresso. Or the boss says don’t take shortcuts, but a friend’s constant adventures stresses you out so much it practically shortens your life! For a lesson in all things ‘katsar’, short in Hebrew, listen to this episode. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Words and expressions discussed: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Katsar – Short – קצר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Espresso katsar – Short espresso – אספרסו קצר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Michnasayim ktsarim – Short pants – מכנסיים קצרים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Ahava ktsara – Short love (story) – אהבה קצרה ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Seret katsar – Short film – סרטים קצרים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Katsar, aval – But let’s do it quickly – קצר אבל ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yesh lach zman le-kafe? Ken, katsar aval – Do you (f.) have time for coffee? Yes, but for a quick one – יש לך זמן לקפה? כן, קצר אבל ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Katsarchik – Diminutive of katsar – קצרצ’יק ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Sirton katsarchik – Teeny weeny clip – סרטון קצרצ’יק ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Lekatser – To shorten – לקצר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Lekatser drachim – To shorten ways – לקצר דרכים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Mekatseret hatsa’it – She is shortening a skirt – מקצרת חצאית ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Lekatser hatsa’it / michnasayim – To shorten a skirt / pants – לקצר חצאית / מכנסיים Eich lekatser be-hetzi et zman bishul ha-pasta – How to cut in half the pasta cooking time – איך לקצר בחצי את זמן בישול הפסטה Ata mekatser li et ha-hayim – You shorten my life – אתה מקצר לי את החיים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Tekatser / tekatsri / tekatsru – Make it shorter – תקצר / תקצרי / תקצרו ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Ha’im sichatacha nehutsa? – Is your call necessary? – האם שיחתך נחוצה? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Bo/Bo’i nekatser – Let’s cut it short – בוא/י נקצר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Kitsur – Abbreviation, Shortening – קיצור ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Be-kitsur – In short, in a nutshell, to cut a long story short – בקיצור ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ More versions: Ha-kitsur, ha-kitser, kitser, hakits, ha-kitskits – הקיצור, הקיצר, קיצר, הקיץ, הקיצקיץ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hakitskits, ba-sof hi lo ba’a – In short, she didn’t make it at the end – הקיצקיץ, בסוף היא לא באה ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Kitsurim – Abbreviations – קיצורים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to listen to the podcast and read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Streetwise Hebrew: For the Love of All Things Short⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(via tlv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
So you’re shopping around for a short-sleeved shirt, and stop for an espresso. Or the boss says don’t take shortcuts, but a friend’s constant adventures stresses you out so much it practically shortens your life! For a lesson in all things ‘katsar’, short in Hebrew, listen to this episode.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Words and expressions discussed:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Katsar – Short – קצר
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Espresso katsar – Short espresso – אספרסו קצר
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Michnasayim ktsarim – Short pants – מכנסיים קצרים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ahava ktsara – Short love (story) – אהבה קצרה
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Seret katsar – Short film – סרטים קצרים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Katsar, aval – But let’s do it quickly – קצר אבל
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yesh lach zman le-kafe? Ken, katsar aval – Do you (f.) have time for coffee? Yes, but for a quick one – יש לך זמן לקפה? כן, קצר אבל
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Katsarchik – Diminutive of katsar – קצרצ’יק
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Sirton katsarchik – Teeny weeny clip – סרטון קצרצ’יק
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Lekatser – To shorten – לקצר
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Lekatser drachim – To shorten ways – לקצר דרכים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Mekatseret hatsa’it – She is shortening a skirt – מקצרת חצאית
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Lekatser hatsa’it / michnasayim – To shorten a skirt / pants – לקצר חצאית / מכנסיים

Eich lekatser be-hetzi et zman bishul ha-pasta – How to cut in half the pasta cooking time – איך לקצר בחצי את זמן בישול הפסטה

Ata mekatser li et ha-hayim – You shorten my life – אתה מקצר לי את החיים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Tekatser / tekatsri / tekatsru – Make it shorter – תקצר / תקצרי / תקצרו
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ha’im sichatacha nehutsa? – Is your call necessary? – האם שיחתך נחוצה?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Bo/Bo’i nekatser – Let’s cut it short – בוא/י נקצר
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Kitsur – Abbreviation, Shortening – קיצור
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Be-kitsur – In short, in a nutshell, to cut a long story short – בקיצור
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
More versions: Ha-kitsur, ha-kitser, kitser, hakits, ha-kitskits – הקיצור, הקיצר, קיצר, הקיץ, הקיצקיץ
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Hakitskits, ba-sof hi lo ba’a – In short, she didn’t make it at the end – הקיצקיץ, בסוף היא לא באה
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Kitsurim – Abbreviations – קיצורים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to listen to the podcast and read the full article.)

65 0

 
 

2017-05-24 14:49:03

The Crazy Torah Celebration That Took Over Our Little Christian Town (via kveller.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In the last year or two, I’ve noticed that my oldest son has become more distant and moody. He spends hours texting alone with his friends, shirks my hugs, and generally appears annoyed and disinterested. Although I know that this can be a normal part of entering adolescence, I still feel a sting of sadness to see my once over-enthusiastic little boy morphing into a sullen teenager. I wonder sometimes if mainstream American adolescence is really “normal” or more of a cultural phenomena. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Last month, my local Chabad had a Torah Dedication Ceremony to celebrate the creation of a new Torah. Although I usually don’t push my oldest son to attend religious events, this seemed important enough to insist on. Reluctantly, he shuffled into the car alongside his exuberant brother and sister. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ When we arrived at the Chabad house, I was surprised to see that, besides the regular crowd of mostly secular Jewish community members, there were dozens of black capped, Orthodox Jews from all over the country. My son turned towards me with a look of panic in his eyes. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “None of my friends are here, Mom. These are all religious people. Can I just sit in the car and play on my phone?” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I informed him that that wasn’t an option and encouraged him to give it some time. After a speech from the Sofer about how Torahs are made and a short ceremony whereby the last letters of the Torah were inscribed, we all headed outside. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ What came next was like nothing I’d ever encountered. The streets had all been blocked off to make way for a procession the likes of which I’m quite certain our small, mostly Christian town has never seen. ⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

The Crazy Torah Celebration That Took Over Our Little Christian Town
(via kveller.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the last year or two, I’ve noticed that my oldest son has become more distant and moody. He spends hours texting alone with his friends, shirks my hugs, and generally appears annoyed and disinterested. Although I know that this can be a normal part of entering adolescence, I still feel a sting of sadness to see my once over-enthusiastic little boy morphing into a sullen teenager. I wonder sometimes if mainstream American adolescence is really “normal” or more of a cultural phenomena.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Last month, my local Chabad had a Torah Dedication Ceremony to celebrate the creation of a new Torah. Although I usually don’t push my oldest son to attend religious events, this seemed important enough to insist on. Reluctantly, he shuffled into the car alongside his exuberant brother and sister.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
When we arrived at the Chabad house, I was surprised to see that, besides the regular crowd of mostly secular Jewish community members, there were dozens of black capped, Orthodox Jews from all over the country. My son turned towards me with a look of panic in his eyes.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
“None of my friends are here, Mom. These are all religious people. Can I just sit in the car and play on my phone?”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
I informed him that that wasn’t an option and encouraged him to give it some time. After a speech from the Sofer about how Torahs are made and a short ceremony whereby the last letters of the Torah were inscribed, we all headed outside.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
What came next was like nothing I’d ever encountered. The streets had all been blocked off to make way for a procession the likes of which I’m quite certain our small, mostly Christian town has never seen.
⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

159 3

Comment
  • @jburdeyez (18 h)
    I recently joined a congregation of messianic Jews...and my favorite part was how they danced and celebrated when the Torah came out! It was amazing ❤ great post!
     
  • 😍
     
  • @bremassiel (18 h)
    😍
     
 

2017-05-24 03:35:26

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Beloved City (via ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yom Yerushalayim—Jerusalem Day—is one of great joy here in Jerusalem. This year is especially significant, as we are celebrating 50 years of Jerusalem united under Israeli control. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The reunification of the beloved city! The festivities! The prayers of thanksgiving echoing throughout the synagogues and reverberating off the ancient stones. The parades. The palpable feeling of joy and commitment. The sense of destiny. The mayor speaks and there are memorial services for those who died in the Six-Day War. For weeks before, the trees are adorned with blue and white lights and there is even a light show, illuminating the walls of the Old City. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ At the end of the Israeli War of Independence, the Holy City of Jerusalem was divided. Jordanian forces controlled sites such as the Western Wall, as well as The Dome of the Rock and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ During the war, one of the most stirring moments occured, which was captured on camera and tape, when Lt. General Mordechai Gur announced, "The Temple Mount is in our hands … the Temple Mount is in our hands!" Why was this so very significant? It was so because once again Jews would finally be able to pray at the Western Wall. From 1948 until that very day, not only were Jews prohibited from having access to the Western Wall, but Israeli Muslims were also prohibited from praying at the Al Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock. Israeli Christians were barred from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. According to the Catholic University Law Review (Spring 1996), prior to 1967 the access to all holy sites was prohibited. The law was one of exclusion. After the war, the law was one of inclusion. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yerushalayim is our inheritance, and not just ours, but Yeshua-following Gentiles as well. It is here that our Lord was crucified and it is to here, a united Jerusalem, free and accessible, where he will return. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Beloved City
(via ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yom Yerushalayim—Jerusalem Day—is one of great joy here in Jerusalem. This year is especially significant, as we are celebrating 50 years of Jerusalem united under Israeli control.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The reunification of the beloved city! The festivities! The prayers of thanksgiving echoing throughout the synagogues and reverberating off the ancient stones. The parades. The palpable feeling of joy and commitment. The sense of destiny. The mayor speaks and there are memorial services for those who died in the Six-Day War. For weeks before, the trees are adorned with blue and white lights and there is even a light show, illuminating the walls of the Old City.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
At the end of the Israeli War of Independence, the Holy City of Jerusalem was divided. Jordanian forces controlled sites such as the Western Wall, as well as The Dome of the Rock and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
During the war, one of the most stirring moments occured, which was captured on camera and tape, when Lt. General Mordechai Gur announced, "The Temple Mount is in our hands … the Temple Mount is in our hands!" Why was this so very significant? It was so because once again Jews would finally be able to pray at the Western Wall. From 1948 until that very day, not only were Jews prohibited from having access to the Western Wall, but Israeli Muslims were also prohibited from praying at the Al Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock. Israeli Christians were barred from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. According to the Catholic University Law Review (Spring 1996), prior to 1967 the access to all holy sites was prohibited. The law was one of exclusion. After the war, the law was one of inclusion.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yerushalayim is our inheritance, and not just ours, but Yeshua-following Gentiles as well. It is here that our Lord was crucified and it is to here, a united Jerusalem, free and accessible, where he will return.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

211 6

Comment
  • @pigomeebe (21 h)
    amen.
     
  • 🙌🏼🇮🇱💙
     
  • Looooove this... And I love this page. You are like Yeshua Hamashiach yourself.😊☺Keep up this forever. Best account on the instagram.
     
  • @jorgeorsida (1 day)
    Lugar maravilhoso. Não conheço ainda, mas amo. Glórias ao Eterno de Israel.
     
  • @frank_usa_1 (1 day)
    HalleluYah! 🕎✡✝. ISRAEL 🇮🇱 for EVER and EVER ✡🕎✝
     
  • Show more comments
     
 

2017-05-23 14:43:52

What Is Gematria? (via myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Gematria is a numerological system by which Hebrew letters correspond to numbers. This system, developed by practitioners of Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism), derived from Greek influence and became a tool for interpreting biblical texts. ⠀⠀ In gematria, each Hebrew letter is represented by a number (for example, aleph = 1, bet = 2, etc.). One can then calculate the numerical value of a word by adding together the values of each letter in it. In the realm of biblical interpretation, commentators base an argument on numerological equivalence of words. If a word’s numerical value equals that of another word, a commentator might draw a connection between these two words and the verses in which they appear and use this to prove larger conceptual conclusions. ⠀⠀ While gematria was used periodically in the Talmud and Midrash, it was not central to rabbinic literature. The rabbis occasionally employed gematria to help support biblical exegesis, but did not rely on it heavily. They were much more invested in the use of logical reasoning and argumentation to support their positions. ⠀⠀ The term “gematria” comes from the Greek “geometria,” and the concept can be found in the writings of the Greek philosopher Plato. In rabbinic literature it first appears in the Baraita of the Thirty-two Rules, by Rabbi Eliezer in 200 CE. This text, which no longer exists except in references, elaborated 32 rules for interpreting the Bible. The 29th rule involved the use of gematria. ⠀⠀ Sefer Yetzirah, the earliest kabbalistic text, believed to have been written in the 2nd century CE, was the first kabbalistic text to elaborate a system of gematria. This text is concerned with God’s creation of the universe through the powers of the Hebrew alphabet, and with the permutations of God’s name. ⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

What Is Gematria?
(via myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gematria is a numerological system by which Hebrew letters correspond to numbers. This system, developed by practitioners of Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism), derived from Greek influence and became a tool for interpreting biblical texts.
⠀⠀
In gematria, each Hebrew letter is represented by a number (for example, aleph = 1, bet = 2, etc.). One can then calculate the numerical value of a word by adding together the values of each letter in it. In the realm of biblical interpretation, commentators base an argument on numerological equivalence of words. If a word’s numerical value equals that of another word, a commentator might draw a connection between these two words and the verses in which they appear and use this to prove larger conceptual conclusions.
⠀⠀
While gematria was used periodically in the Talmud and Midrash, it was not central to rabbinic literature. The rabbis occasionally employed gematria to help support biblical exegesis, but did not rely on it heavily. They were much more invested in the use of logical reasoning and argumentation to support their positions.
⠀⠀
The term “gematria” comes from the Greek “geometria,” and the concept can be found in the writings of the Greek philosopher Plato. In rabbinic literature it first appears in the Baraita of the Thirty-two Rules, by Rabbi Eliezer in 200 CE. This text, which no longer exists except in references, elaborated 32 rules for interpreting the Bible. The 29th rule involved the use of gematria.
⠀⠀
Sefer Yetzirah, the earliest kabbalistic text, believed to have been written in the 2nd century CE, was the first kabbalistic text to elaborate a system of gematria. This text is concerned with God’s creation of the universe through the powers of the Hebrew alphabet, and with the permutations of God’s name.
⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

187 3

Comment
  • I've actually started learning Hebrew and it's an amazing language! The hidden meaning behind everything is soo crazy. And to me it's actually easier to learn than English which is my native language. Once you know the meaning and picture behind each letter then a whole new world of understanding opens up to you. I wish I would have learned this at a young age.
     
  • 👏
     
  • @tchipotle (1 day)
    Cool
     
 

2017-05-23 03:28:47

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yom Yerushalayim, Jerusalem Day (via www.myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yom Yerushalayim — Jerusalem Day — is the most recent addition to the Hebrew calendar. It is celebrated on the 28th day of Iyar (six weeks after the Passover seder, one week before the eve of Shavuot). In 2017, Yom Yerushalayim falls on May 24. Although Jerusalem has been considered the capital city of the Jewish people since the time of King David — who conquered it and built it as the seat of his monarchy in approximately 1000 B.C.E.–there has never been a special day in honor of the city until the Israeli army took over the ancient, eastern part of the city on the third day of the Six-Day War in June 1967. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Shortly after the Six-Day War, “a municipal unification” of the two sections of the city took place, ending 19 years of separation between predominantly Arab and Jewish suburbs of Jerusalem, following the War of Independence in 1948. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Due to the young age of this holiday, there is still not much unique customs and traditions. It is gradually becoming a “pilgrimage” day, when thousands of Israelis travel (some hike) to Jerusalem to demonstrate solidarity with the city. This show of solidarity is of special importance to the state of Israel, since the international community has never approved the “reunification” of the city under Israeli sovereignty, and many countries have not recognized Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Israeli education system devotes the week preceding this day to enhancing the knowledge of the history and geography of the city, with a special emphasis on the unique role that it played in Jewish messianic aspirations since Biblical times. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The ambiguity of the religious status of this holiday is reflected in celebrations — or lack thereof — outside of Israel. While the city of Jerusalem has significant meaning for all Jews, Yom Yerushalayim has yet to attain the popularity of Yom Ha’atzmaut and is not observed extensively outside of Israel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yom Yerushalayim, Jerusalem Day
(via www.myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yom Yerushalayim — Jerusalem Day — is the most recent addition to the Hebrew calendar. It is celebrated on the 28th day of Iyar (six weeks after the Passover seder, one week before the eve of Shavuot). In 2017, Yom Yerushalayim falls on May 24. Although Jerusalem has been considered the capital city of the Jewish people since the time of King David — who conquered it and built it as the seat of his monarchy in approximately 1000 B.C.E.–there has never been a special day in honor of the city until the Israeli army took over the ancient, eastern part of the city on the third day of the Six-Day War in June 1967.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Shortly after the Six-Day War, “a municipal unification” of the two sections of the city took place, ending 19 years of separation between predominantly Arab and Jewish suburbs of Jerusalem, following the War of Independence in 1948.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Due to the young age of this holiday, there is still not much unique customs and traditions. It is gradually becoming a “pilgrimage” day, when thousands of Israelis travel (some hike) to Jerusalem to demonstrate solidarity with the city. This show of solidarity is of special importance to the state of Israel, since the international community has never approved the “reunification” of the city under Israeli sovereignty, and many countries have not recognized Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Israeli education system devotes the week preceding this day to enhancing the knowledge of the history and geography of the city, with a special emphasis on the unique role that it played in Jewish messianic aspirations since Biblical times.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The ambiguity of the religious status of this holiday is reflected in celebrations — or lack thereof — outside of Israel. While the city of Jerusalem has significant meaning for all Jews, Yom Yerushalayim has yet to attain the popularity of Yom Ha’atzmaut and is not observed extensively outside of Israel.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

334 3

Comment
  • Chag Sameach!
     
  • @bremassiel (2 days)
    Oh thanks! I kept researching for the correct date and google tells me it starts May 23rd...
     
  • @adanma7 (2 days)
    "If I forget you O Jerusalem , let my Right Hand forget its skill ."
     
 

2017-05-22 15:30:40

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hava Nagila’s Long, Strange Trip (via www.myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If there is one Jewish song known by Jews and non-Jews alike, it is undoubtedly Hava Nagila. From an obscure origin in early 20th-century, the song has become a perennial favorite at weddings, bar and bat mitzvahs, Jewish and non-Jewish cultural events around the world. Yet few know the history of this global Jewish hit. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Like many modern Israeli and popular Jewish songs, Hava Nagila began its life as a Hasidic melody in Eastern Europe. At the turn of the last century, a group of Sadigorer Hasidim emigrated to Jerusalem and brought the nigun (wordless melody) with them. There the melody might have remained in the cloistered world of Jerusalem’s Hasidic communities if not for one man, Avraham Zvi Idelsohn — the father of Jewish musicology. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As a passionate Zionist, Idelsohn sought to collect and preserve the folk music of Jewish communities from around the world. At the same time, he sought to pioneer a new style of modern national music that would unify the Jewish people as they returned to their historic homeland. To that end, he arranged and composed many new Hebrew-language songs based on traditional melodies. Among them was Hava Nagila. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Idelsohn transcribed the Sadigorer melody in 1915. In 1918 he selected the tune for a celebration concert performance in Jerusalem after the British army had defeated the Turks. Arranging the melody in four parts, Idelsohn added a Hebrew text derived from Psalms: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hava nagila, hava nagila Let us rejoice, let us rejoice Hava nagila ve-nismeha Let us rejoice and be glad Hava neranena, hava neranena Let us sing, let us sing Hava neranena ve-nismeha Let us sing and be glad Uru, uru ahim Awake, awake brothers Uru ahim be-lev sameah Awake brothers with a joyful heart ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The words echo the biblical verse: “This is the day that God has made. We will rejoice and be glad in it” – “Ze ha-yom asah adonai, nagila ve-nismeha bo” (Psalm 118:24) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to watch a video and read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Hava Nagila’s Long, Strange Trip
(via www.myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
If there is one Jewish song known by Jews and non-Jews alike, it is undoubtedly Hava Nagila. From an obscure origin in early 20th-century, the song has become a perennial favorite at weddings, bar and bat mitzvahs, Jewish and non-Jewish cultural events around the world. Yet few know the history of this global Jewish hit.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Like many modern Israeli and popular Jewish songs, Hava Nagila began its life as a Hasidic melody in Eastern Europe. At the turn of the last century, a group of Sadigorer Hasidim emigrated to Jerusalem and brought the nigun (wordless melody) with them. There the melody might have remained in the cloistered world of Jerusalem’s Hasidic communities if not for one man, Avraham Zvi Idelsohn — the father of Jewish musicology.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As a passionate Zionist, Idelsohn sought to collect and preserve the folk music of Jewish communities from around the world. At the same time, he sought to pioneer a new style of modern national music that would unify the Jewish people as they returned to their historic homeland. To that end, he arranged and composed many new Hebrew-language songs based on traditional melodies. Among them was Hava Nagila.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Idelsohn transcribed the Sadigorer melody in 1915. In 1918 he selected the tune for a celebration concert performance in Jerusalem after the British army had defeated the Turks. Arranging the melody in four parts, Idelsohn added a Hebrew text derived from Psalms:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Hava nagila, hava nagila Let us rejoice, let us rejoice
Hava nagila ve-nismeha Let us rejoice and be glad
Hava neranena, hava neranena Let us sing, let us sing
Hava neranena ve-nismeha Let us sing and be glad
Uru, uru ahim Awake, awake brothers
Uru ahim be-lev sameah Awake brothers with a joyful heart
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The words echo the biblical verse: “This is the day that God has made. We will rejoice and be glad in it” – “Ze ha-yom asah adonai, nagila ve-nismeha bo” (Psalm 118:24)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to watch a video and read the full article.)

161 6

Comment
  • Me gusta mucho los relatos de los que hablas Me gusta estudiar las escrituras hebreo judios árabes 👍
     
  • @djburnhardnyc (3 days)
    Lovely, and informative post..Praise God!
     
  • @mandiv79 (3 days)
    😍
     
  • @jburdeyez (3 days)
    Woke up singing this song like a month ago 💛 💃 #thankyouforthispost
     
  • @anjellahds55 (3 days)
    Now I know. Always wondered about this song. Always liked it too.
     
 

2017-05-21 13:50:58

Trump's Visit to Israel Puts Jewish State in Focus (via worldreligionnews.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On May 14, 1948, President Harry S. Truman recognized the newly created State of Israel, against the advice of his own State Department. With his bold action, Truman set into motion what has become one of the closest and most sincere alliances in modern history: the U.S. – Israel relationship. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Since Truman’s time, five sitting U.S. presidents have visited Israel (Nixon, Carter, Clinton, George W. Bush, Obama), demonstrating to the world our nation’s determined and eternal commitment to the safety and security of the Jewish State. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On May 22, President Donald Trump will become the sixth U.S. President to visit Israel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Trump’s visit is all the more historic for its timing and itinerary: his trip comes just a day before Jerusalem Day, which this year celebrates the 50th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem by Israeli forces in 1967. Trump will also be the first sitting U.S. President to visit the Western Wall – Judaism’s holiest site. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ So why the big American attention for such a small strip of land? ⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

Trump's Visit to Israel Puts Jewish State in Focus
(via worldreligionnews.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
On May 14, 1948, President Harry S. Truman recognized the newly created State of Israel, against the advice of his own State Department. With his bold action, Truman set into motion what has become one of the closest and most sincere alliances in modern history: the U.S. – Israel relationship.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Since Truman’s time, five sitting U.S. presidents have visited Israel (Nixon, Carter, Clinton, George W. Bush, Obama), demonstrating to the world our nation’s determined and eternal commitment to the safety and security of the Jewish State. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
On May 22, President Donald Trump will become the sixth U.S. President to visit Israel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Trump’s visit is all the more historic for its timing and itinerary: his trip comes just a day before Jerusalem Day, which this year celebrates the 50th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem by Israeli forces in 1967. Trump will also be the first sitting U.S. President to visit the Western Wall – Judaism’s holiest site. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
So why the big American attention for such a small strip of land?
⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

65 0

 
 

2017-05-21 02:35:01

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ How to Treat Jewish Holy Books (Sifrei Kodesh) (via www.myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If the description of God as King or Sovereign has a physical manifestation in Judaism, it is through the decoration of the Sefer Torah , the scroll of the Torah written on parchment. In Ashkenazic (Central and East European) Jewry, the Sefer Torah is dressed in an elaborate cloth mantle, which is frequently decorated with semi-precious stones and a breastplate. In Sephardic (Western European and Arabic) Jewry, the Sefer Torah is kept in its own case, usually made of silver. In both communities, the Sefer Torah is adorned with a crown, also of silver. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ When the Torah is lifted, people stand. When the Torah is carried around the congregation, people face it and kiss its mantle out of respect (the parchment is never touched directly). The 16th-century Kabbalist (mystic), Elijah ben Moses de Vidas, described the royal image of the Torah explicitly, “When one carries holy books, one should act as though one is carrying the clothes of the king before the king” (Sefer Reshit Hokhmah). De Vidas is drawing on an idea expressed in the Zohar. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Hierarchy of Books ... (please read full article) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ De Vidas said that showing honor to one’s library includes placing books in a prominent place in one’s home, protecting them with heavy pieces of cloth, and using traps to protect the books from destruction by rodents or cats. If a book is shelved upside down, one is to turn the book right side up and kiss it (Tzvi Hirsch Koidonover, d. 1719, in Sefer Kav haYashar). One should not shame a holy book by placing it on a bench on which one is sitting , exposing one’s nakedness to it, or taking it into a bathroom. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ What happens if a Sefer Torah falls to the ground? Many people believe that the person responsible should fast, along with any who saw the Torah fall. The origin of this custom, however, is fairly late (17th century), apparently popularized by the Polish authority R. Abraham Gombiner. Other rabbis have suggested alternatives... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
How to Treat Jewish Holy Books (Sifrei Kodesh)
(via www.myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
If the description of God as King or Sovereign has a physical manifestation in Judaism, it is through the decoration of the Sefer Torah , the scroll of the Torah written on parchment. In Ashkenazic (Central and East European) Jewry, the Sefer Torah is dressed in an elaborate cloth mantle, which is frequently decorated with semi-precious stones and a breastplate. In Sephardic (Western European and Arabic) Jewry, the Sefer Torah is kept in its own case, usually made of silver. In both communities, the Sefer Torah is adorned with a crown, also of silver.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
When the Torah is lifted, people stand. When the Torah is carried around the congregation, people face it and kiss its mantle out of respect (the parchment is never touched directly). The 16th-century Kabbalist (mystic), Elijah ben Moses de Vidas, described the royal image of the Torah explicitly, “When one carries holy books, one should act as though one is carrying the clothes of the king before the king” (Sefer Reshit Hokhmah). De Vidas is drawing on an idea expressed in the Zohar.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Hierarchy of Books ... (please read full article)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
De Vidas said that showing honor to one’s library includes placing books in a prominent place in one’s home, protecting them with heavy pieces of cloth, and using traps to protect the books from destruction by rodents or cats. If a book is shelved upside down, one is to turn the book right side up and kiss it (Tzvi Hirsch Koidonover, d. 1719, in Sefer Kav haYashar). One should not shame a holy book by placing it on a bench on which one is sitting , exposing one’s nakedness to it, or taking it into a bathroom.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
What happens if a Sefer Torah falls to the ground? Many people believe that the person responsible should fast, along with any who saw the Torah fall. The origin of this custom, however, is fairly late (17th century), apparently popularized by the Polish authority R. Abraham Gombiner. Other rabbis have suggested alternatives... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

111 1

Comment
 

2017-05-19 08:50:23

Say What?! (via tlv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ How do we say “I told you so” in Hebrew? And “Who said?” or “You don’t say!” In this episode, host Guy Sharett teaches these useful expressions and more for, well, talking about what people say. They all stem from the root ‘amar,’ meaning ‘he said.’ What say you, Guy? ⠀⠀ Words and expressions discussed: ⠀⠀ Amar – He said – אמר ⠀⠀ Amarta – You (m.) said – אמרתָ ⠀⠀ Amart – You (f.) said – אמרתְ ⠀⠀ Ma she-ne’emar – What was said – מה שנאמר ⠀⠀ Amart li etmol – You (f.) told me yesterday – אמרת לי אתמול ⠀⠀ She-halamt alai ba-laila – That you dreamt about me last night – שחלמת עליי בלילה ⠀⠀ Kshe’elohim amar – When god said – כשאלוהים אמר ⠀⠀ Ba-pa’am ha-rishona – In the first time – בפעם הראשונה ⠀⠀ Mi amar – Who said so? – ?מי אמר ⠀⠀ Hi amra li – She said to me – היא אמרה לי ⠀⠀ Az amarti lo – So I told him – אז אמרתי לו ⠀⠀ Hu amar li – He told me – הוא אמר לי ⠀⠀ Az ma hu amar – So what did he say? – ?אז מה הוא אמר ⠀⠀ Ve-ma at amart? – And what did you (f.) say? – ?ומה את אמרת ⠀⠀ Amarti lecha/lach – I told you so – אמרתי לך ⠀⠀ Ma amarnu? – What did we say? – ?מה אמרנו ⠀⠀ Amru lo – They told him – אמרו לו ⠀⠀ Omrim she-haya po same’ach lifnei she-noladeti – They say that happiness was here before I was born – אומרים שהיה פה שמח לפני שנולדתי ⠀⠀ Ma omrim? – What do you say? – ?מה אומרים ⠀⠀ Omrim she – They say that – …אומרים ש ⠀⠀ Ma at omeret? Ma ata omer? – You don’t say? – ?מה את אומרת? מה אתה אומר ⠀⠀ Tamshich lahlom – Keep dreaming – תמשיך לחלום ⠀⠀ Zot omeret – It means – זאת אומרת ⠀⠀ Maztomeret (Ma zot omeret)? – What does it mean? – (?מזתומרת? (מה זאת אומרת ⠀⠀ Amur la’asot – Supposed to do – אמור לעשות ⠀⠀ Hu amur lehagi’a be-shmone – He is supposed to come at eight – הוא אמור להגיע בשמונה ⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the podcast link.)

Say What?!
(via tlv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
How do we say “I told you so” in Hebrew? And “Who said?” or “You don’t say!” In this episode, host Guy Sharett teaches these useful expressions and more for, well, talking about what people say. They all stem from the root ‘amar,’ meaning ‘he said.’ What say you, Guy?
⠀⠀
Words and expressions discussed: ⠀⠀
Amar – He said – אמר
⠀⠀
Amarta – You (m.) said – אמרתָ
⠀⠀
Amart – You (f.) said – אמרתְ
⠀⠀
Ma she-ne’emar – What was said – מה שנאמר
⠀⠀
Amart li etmol – You (f.) told me yesterday – אמרת לי אתמול
⠀⠀
She-halamt alai ba-laila – That you dreamt about me last night – שחלמת עליי בלילה
⠀⠀
Kshe’elohim amar – When god said – כשאלוהים אמר
⠀⠀
Ba-pa’am ha-rishona – In the first time – בפעם הראשונה
⠀⠀
Mi amar – Who said so? – ?מי אמר
⠀⠀
Hi amra li – She said to me – היא אמרה לי
⠀⠀
Az amarti lo – So I told him – אז אמרתי לו
⠀⠀
Hu amar li – He told me – הוא אמר לי
⠀⠀
Az ma hu amar – So what did he say? – ?אז מה הוא אמר
⠀⠀
Ve-ma at amart? – And what did you (f.) say? – ?ומה את אמרת
⠀⠀
Amarti lecha/lach – I told you so – אמרתי לך
⠀⠀
Ma amarnu? – What did we say? – ?מה אמרנו
⠀⠀
Amru lo – They told him – אמרו לו
⠀⠀
Omrim she-haya po same’ach lifnei she-noladeti – They say that happiness was here before I was born – אומרים שהיה פה שמח לפני שנולדתי
⠀⠀
Ma omrim? – What do you say? – ?מה אומרים
⠀⠀
Omrim she – They say that – …אומרים ש
⠀⠀
Ma at omeret? Ma ata omer? – You don’t say? – ?מה את אומרת? מה אתה אומר
⠀⠀
Tamshich lahlom – Keep dreaming – תמשיך לחלום
⠀⠀
Zot omeret – It means – זאת אומרת
⠀⠀
Maztomeret (Ma zot omeret)? – What does it mean? – (?מזתומרת? (מה זאת אומרת
⠀⠀
Amur la’asot – Supposed to do – אמור לעשות
⠀⠀
Hu amur lehagi’a be-shmone – He is supposed to come at eight – הוא אמור להגיע בשמונה
⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the podcast link.)

165 0

 
 

2017-05-19 04:36:23

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Living Stones of Jerusalem (via www.oneforisrael.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ By sunset, Jerusalem’s stone walls are radiant with rosy golden and tawny hues, making it glow like a city of gold. There is a law passed during the time of the British mandate forbidding building using any other stone other than Jerusalem stone in the area, to preserve the heritage of the beautiful city. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This famous “Jerusalem stone” is made of limestone and dolomite formed over many years of compressing shells and corals – sea creatures of the past, compacted and compressed into stone and fossils. Jerusalem’s stones are teeming with life, and likewise, we are called to be living stones. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Biblical references to the walls give us an insight into God’s feelings on the matter, e.g. in Isaiah 49:14-16, Nehemiah 1:3-4, 2:13. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Walls are pretty important and symbolic in the Bible – especially the walls of Jerusalem. Walls, stones and breaches have a spiritual meaning for us as well. We can see Nehemiah’s mission to build and to restore the breaches in the walls as symbolic of us as believers, seeking to be built up in unity, with no divisions and breaches between us – building the Kingdom of God, using us, his living stones. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Once again, the miracle of God’s grace extended out to all the nations is apparent. We are his living stones, chosen and precious. But just like Israel and Jerusalem, we are chosen for a purpose – that we may proclaim the excellencies of God. Perhaps you might like to meditate on this picture of a wall… the building work involved… the danger of gaps and breaches, and the importance of the cornerstone. I find it interesting how upset the enemies became when the breaches were repaired in Nehemiah. Food for thought. Our right relationships with other believers are critical – we must seek peace and healing of divisions among us as a high priority. Let’s work hard with God to repair every breach and division and cause the enemy to despair. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Lastly, there is the image of the “Watchman on the Walls”... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Living Stones of Jerusalem
(via www.oneforisrael.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
By sunset, Jerusalem’s stone walls are radiant with rosy golden and tawny hues, making it glow like a city of gold. There is a law passed during the time of the British mandate forbidding building using any other stone other than Jerusalem stone in the area, to preserve the heritage of the beautiful city. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This famous “Jerusalem stone” is made of limestone and dolomite formed over many years of compressing shells and corals – sea creatures of the past, compacted and compressed into stone and fossils. Jerusalem’s stones are teeming with life, and likewise, we are called to be living stones.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Biblical references to the walls give us an insight into God’s feelings on the matter, e.g. in Isaiah 49:14-16, Nehemiah 1:3-4, 2:13.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Walls are pretty important and symbolic in the Bible – especially the walls of Jerusalem. Walls, stones and breaches have a spiritual meaning for us as well. We can see Nehemiah’s mission to build and to restore the breaches in the walls as symbolic of us as believers, seeking to be built up in unity, with no divisions and breaches between us – building the Kingdom of God, using us, his living stones.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Once again, the miracle of God’s grace extended out to all the nations is apparent. We are his living stones, chosen and precious. But just like Israel and Jerusalem, we are chosen for a purpose – that we may proclaim the excellencies of God. Perhaps you might like to meditate on this picture of a wall… the building work involved… the danger of gaps and breaches, and the importance of the cornerstone. I find it interesting how upset the enemies became when the breaches were repaired in Nehemiah. Food for thought. Our right relationships with other believers are critical – we must seek peace and healing of divisions among us as a high priority. Let’s work hard with God to repair every breach and division and cause the enemy to despair.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Lastly, there is the image of the “Watchman on the Walls”...
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

197 9

Comment
  • @holylanguage (3 days)
    @sarahlawver I'll have to disagree with this statement regarding Israel's status as chosen, but thankfully we have the freedom to agree to disagree
     
  • @sarahlawver (5 days)
    Thankfully Israel isn't chosen today.
     
  • @sarahlawver (5 days)
    Losers and posers follow people just to get followers. Get a life attention seeker.
     
  • @tchipotle (5 days)
    If we all seriously 'count the Omer' these days....
     
  • @bremassiel (6 days)
    😍😍😍❤️❤️❤️
     
  • Show more comments
     
 

2017-05-18 12:54:00

France's new president will NOT recognize 'Palestine (via israeltoday.co.il) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Palestinian Arabs probably celebrated the victory of Emmanuel Macron in France's presidential election last week. ⠀⠀ After all, his opponent, Marine Le Pen, made abundantly clear her frustration with, if not outright disdain for, the Islamic world. ⠀⠀ But there was another aspect to the election for Palestinians, who have in recent years tried to get France to take a central role in the Middle East peace process, confident that the liberal European power would be among the first to openly embrace a Palestinian state. ⠀⠀ Surely, many thought, Macron's liberal credentials meant he jump at the opportunity to help birth "Palestine." ⠀⠀ However, shortly before taking office, Macron made perfectly clear that he would do no such thing. ⠀⠀ "Unilateral recognition of Palestine, right now, will undermine stability," said Macron at a political rally, adding that he would not risk France's relationship with Israel to serve the Palestinian agenda. ⠀⠀ That's right. France's new liberal president would rather maintain good relations with Israel than recognize "Palestine." ⠀⠀ In fact, Macron is even on record equating anti-Zionism with antisemitism, insisting that hatred for the Jewish state "leads directly to antisemitism." ⠀⠀ Seems the Palestinians' list of braindead allies is growing thinner. ⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

France's new president will NOT recognize 'Palestine
(via israeltoday.co.il)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Palestinian Arabs probably celebrated the victory of Emmanuel Macron in France's presidential election last week.
⠀⠀
After all, his opponent, Marine Le Pen, made abundantly clear her frustration with, if not outright disdain for, the Islamic world.
⠀⠀
But there was another aspect to the election for Palestinians, who have in recent years tried to get France to take a central role in the Middle East peace process, confident that the liberal European power would be among the first to openly embrace a Palestinian state.
⠀⠀
Surely, many thought, Macron's liberal credentials meant he jump at the opportunity to help birth "Palestine."
⠀⠀
However, shortly before taking office, Macron made perfectly clear that he would do no such thing.
⠀⠀
"Unilateral recognition of Palestine, right now, will undermine stability," said Macron at a political rally, adding that he would not risk France's relationship with Israel to serve the Palestinian agenda.
⠀⠀
That's right. France's new liberal president would rather maintain good relations with Israel than recognize "Palestine."
⠀⠀
In fact, Macron is even on record equating anti-Zionism with antisemitism, insisting that hatred for the Jewish state "leads directly to antisemitism."
⠀⠀
Seems the Palestinians' list of braindead allies is growing thinner.
⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the full article.)

117 13

Comment
  • @holylanguage (3 days)
    @auranalexandra interestingly at the time revelation was written, Antichrist was believed to be Nero. The Hebrew numerology for Caesar Nero equaled 666 except in a few manuscripts which spelled his name differently and had a different number of the beast. No one really can know who the final beast will actually be, so we have to be careful to label leaders with the title. I remember when it was believed that Javier Solana was possibly the beast.
     
  • @sarahlawver (5 days)
    He's an idiot..
     
  • I wish you make a post about false prophets which have warned on the bible. I just admire your posts with my pathetic knowledge. 😊☺
     
  • Im so tired for the "palestine" and its supporters. Every where and all the time they spread that lie. Its almost make me sick.😫😔
     
  • @nat.prophet (6 days)
    Woow Aleluyah be praised the Lord. Yeshua Hamashiaj!!!!! Aleluyah. Oh I'm so happy. Thanks for the information @holylanguage. Please you have to learn Spanish. :(. I wanna learn Hebrew but I do not speake English a lot like you.... God bless you. This is a good new from France, soon Venezuela will help Israel!..
     
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2017-05-18 01:45:44

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Study to Learn – Learn to Do! (via torahclub.ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Torah portion begins by saying, "If you walk in My statutes and keep My commandments so as to carry them out ... " (Leviticus 26:3). Isn't that a bit redundant? What is the difference between (1) walking in the statutes, (2) keeping the commandments and (3) carrying them out? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In his classic commentaries on the Torah, Rashi wondered about this too and proposed a solution. He suggested that "walking in the statutes" refers to intensive study of the Torah. "Keeping the commandments" refers to learning how the commandments of Torah are properly kept. "Carrying them out" refers to actually doing what the commandments say to do. In other words, we should study Torah for the purpose of learning it, and we should learn it for the purpose of doing it. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This approach to Torah may seem obvious. It isn't. Sometimes we study the Bible simply for the sake of learning the Scriptures, but we never get around to doing what the Bible tells us to do. We often hear the Word of God and learn its message but fail to put it into practice. This is especially true in regard to the laws of Torah. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In some Christian schools of thought, the laws of Torah are believed to have spiritual meanings instead of literal meanings. That suggests that the laws of Torah were never meant to be kept; they were only meant to be understood as spiritual lessons. Early church writings spoke about the spiritual meanings of the Torah's commandments while discouraging people from actually practicing the Torah. That kind of thinking resulted from the influence of philosophical thought in the early church. In the philosophical worldview, the acquisition of knowledge is a worthy goal in and of itself. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In Jewish thought, the purpose for studying is more than simply the acquisition of knowledge. Knowledge and learning are regarded only as means for better serving God. Therefore, in Jewish thought, we study to learn and we learn to do. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Study to Learn – Learn to Do!
(via torahclub.ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Torah portion begins by saying, "If you walk in My statutes and keep My commandments so as to carry them out ... " (Leviticus 26:3). Isn't that a bit redundant? What is the difference between (1) walking in the statutes, (2) keeping the commandments and (3) carrying them out?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In his classic commentaries on the Torah, Rashi wondered about this too and proposed a solution. He suggested that "walking in the statutes" refers to intensive study of the Torah. "Keeping the commandments" refers to learning how the commandments of Torah are properly kept. "Carrying them out" refers to actually doing what the commandments say to do. In other words, we should study Torah for the purpose of learning it, and we should learn it for the purpose of doing it.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This approach to Torah may seem obvious. It isn't. Sometimes we study the Bible simply for the sake of learning the Scriptures, but we never get around to doing what the Bible tells us to do. We often hear the Word of God and learn its message but fail to put it into practice. This is especially true in regard to the laws of Torah.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In some Christian schools of thought, the laws of Torah are believed to have spiritual meanings instead of literal meanings. That suggests that the laws of Torah were never meant to be kept; they were only meant to be understood as spiritual lessons. Early church writings spoke about the spiritual meanings of the Torah's commandments while discouraging people from actually practicing the Torah. That kind of thinking resulted from the influence of philosophical thought in the early church. In the philosophical worldview, the acquisition of knowledge is a worthy goal in and of itself.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In Jewish thought, the purpose for studying is more than simply the acquisition of knowledge. Knowledge and learning are regarded only as means for better serving God. Therefore, in Jewish thought, we study to learn and we learn to do.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

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Comment
  • @holylanguage (3 days)
    @noneedtostalkme many do, but many more unfortunately do not. We must work to change this with acts of love and the truth :)
     
  • @sarahlawver (5 days)
    Anna true. They think Jesus isn't the Messiah yet believe there is a different one referred to in the Torah. 😂
     
  • @sarahlawver (5 days)
    And yet they don't today.
     
  • I think the jews and christians waiting for the same Messiah, but jews does not know it.😊☺
     
  • @boo_soonyew_67 (6 days)
    Of course, God's grace means He will also provide, as He did the Passover Lamb !!
     
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2017-05-17 14:31:11

 

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