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What Is One Little Goat Doing in My Haggadah? (via FFoZ.org) ⠀⠀⠀ Some of the songs are a bit mysterious, however. The strangest song of them all is a classic entitled, Chad Gadya, which means “one little goat” in Aramaic. Its lyrics describe a chain of events involving animals, not unlike the famous “I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. ⠀⠀⠀ It starts like this: ⠀⠀⠀ // One little goat, one little goat. // That father bought for two zuzim, // one little goat, one little goat. // Then came a cat and ate the goat, // that father bought for two zuzim, // one little goat, one little goat. ⠀⠀⠀⠀ // Then came a dog and bit the cat, that ate the goat... // ⠀⠀⠀⠀ And so on. You get the idea. But what is the point of this song? ⠀⠀⠀ Spend a little time with the song and you will realize that it is deeper than it first sounds. The plot continues: Water quenched the fire. An ox drank the water. A butcher slaughtered the ox. ⠀⠀⠀ Then the song takes a dark and surprising turn. ⠀⠀⠀⠀ // Then came the angel of death and slew the butcher, that slew the ox… // ⠀⠀⠀⠀ What kind of nursery rhyme is this anyway? ⠀⠀⠀⠀ And then, the final verse brings a powerful conclusion: ⠀⠀⠀⠀ // Then came the Holy One, blessed is he, and slew the angel of death, // that slew the butcher, that slew the ox, that drank the water, // that quenched the fire, that burned the stick, that beat the dog, // that bit the cat, that ate the goat, that father bought for two zuzim, // one little goat, one little goat. // ⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the article and to find out how the lyrics relate to Messiah)

What Is One Little Goat Doing in My Haggadah?
(via FFoZ.org)
⠀⠀⠀
Some of the songs are a bit mysterious, however. The strangest song of them all is a classic entitled, Chad Gadya, which means “one little goat” in Aramaic. Its lyrics describe a chain of events involving animals, not unlike the famous “I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly.
⠀⠀⠀
It starts like this:
⠀⠀⠀
// One little goat, one little goat.
// That father bought for two zuzim,
// one little goat, one little goat.
// Then came a cat and ate the goat,
// that father bought for two zuzim,
// one little goat, one little goat. ⠀⠀⠀⠀
// Then came a dog and bit the cat, that ate the goat... //
⠀⠀⠀⠀
And so on. You get the idea. But what is the point of this song?
⠀⠀⠀
Spend a little time with the song and you will realize that it is deeper than it first sounds. The plot continues: Water quenched the fire. An ox drank the water. A butcher slaughtered the ox.
⠀⠀⠀
Then the song takes a dark and surprising turn.
⠀⠀⠀⠀
// Then came the angel of death and slew the butcher, that slew the ox… //
⠀⠀⠀⠀
What kind of nursery rhyme is this anyway?
⠀⠀⠀⠀
And then, the final verse brings a powerful conclusion:
⠀⠀⠀⠀
// Then came the Holy One, blessed is he, and slew the angel of death,
// that slew the butcher, that slew the ox, that drank the water,
// that quenched the fire, that burned the stick, that beat the dog,
// that bit the cat, that ate the goat, that father bought for two zuzim,
// one little goat, one little goat. //
⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the article and to find out how the lyrics relate to Messiah)

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2017-03-29 02:48:06

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Parashat HaChodesh: Transcending Time (via ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This [past] Shabbat is one of four special weeks leading up to Passover that are given names and additional readings. This week’s reading is called Parashat HaChodesh, because we add to the weekly Torah readings a passage out of Exodus 12, which opens with the words hachodesh hazeh, “this month.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This reading lays the cornerstone for Jewish reckoning of time, our world’s most precious resource. One might have hoards of wealth, but if they have no time, then they have nothing. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Time is the essence of freedom. When someone controls your time, then you are their slave, just as the taskmasters in Egypt dominated the Israelites. When you are the master of your own time, you are truly a free person. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In Judaism there is a strange tension and rivalry between the “two great luminaries,” the sun and the moon. While both mark time through their cycles, they are very different. In terms of seasons and the natural world, the start of each year is practically the same. With each month, however, there is a dramatic transformation from its beginning to its end. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Hebrew words for years and months reflect this difference. In Hebrew, a year is called a shanah, which comes from a root meaning “to repeat.” A month is called a chodesh, which means “to become new.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In Jewish thought, the cycle of the natural world began with the autumn month of Tishrei. This is the turn of the agricultural year, when the harvest is complete and plowing for the next year begins. The month of Tishrei thus symbolizes the static and mechanical world in which we live, the natural laws of physics, and the inevitable sequence of cause and effect. That’s why in Judaism we refer to the first of Tishrei as Rosh HaShanah—the “head of the year.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article, plus bonus read about Shabbat HaHodesh here: Special Shabbatot at ✤ http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/special-shabbatot/)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Parashat HaChodesh: Transcending Time
(via ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This [past] Shabbat is one of four special weeks leading up to Passover that are given names and additional readings. This week’s reading is called Parashat HaChodesh, because we add to the weekly Torah readings a passage out of Exodus 12, which opens with the words hachodesh hazeh, “this month.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This reading lays the cornerstone for Jewish reckoning of time, our world’s most precious resource. One might have hoards of wealth, but if they have no time, then they have nothing.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Time is the essence of freedom. When someone controls your time, then you are their slave, just as the taskmasters in Egypt dominated the Israelites. When you are the master of your own time, you are truly a free person.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In Judaism there is a strange tension and rivalry between the “two great luminaries,” the sun and the moon. While both mark time through their cycles, they are very different. In terms of seasons and the natural world, the start of each year is practically the same. With each month, however, there is a dramatic transformation from its beginning to its end.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Hebrew words for years and months reflect this difference. In Hebrew, a year is called a shanah, which comes from a root meaning “to repeat.” A month is called a chodesh, which means “to become new.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In Jewish thought, the cycle of the natural world began with the autumn month of Tishrei. This is the turn of the agricultural year, when the harvest is complete and plowing for the next year begins. The month of Tishrei thus symbolizes the static and mechanical world in which we live, the natural laws of physics, and the inevitable sequence of cause and effect. That’s why in Judaism we refer to the first of Tishrei as Rosh HaShanah—the “head of the year.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article, plus bonus read about Shabbat HaHodesh here: Special Shabbatot at
✤ http://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/special-shabbatot/)

123 1

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  • @tbbelredentor (10 h)
    Interesting information...Thanks for sharing it!
     
 

2017-03-28 15:20:40

Golden Rule vs. The Torah (via FFoZ.org) ⠀⠀⠀ Rabbi Yeshua told His disciples that the Golden Rule “is the Torah and the Prophets.” In other words, it expresses the ethical core behind the message of the whole Bible. ⠀⠀⠀ Bible teachers sometimes suppose that the Master meant that the Golden Rule replaces the Law. They use Matthew 7:12 as an escape clause from the other commandments of the Torah. That is to say, if a man simply does to others what he would have them do to him, he need not concern himself with the specifics of the commandments. According to this idea, Yeshua abolished the Torah and replaced it with this shorter, easier-to-remember formula. ⠀⠀⠀⠀ On the contrary, the Master did not say, “This replaces the Torah and the Prophets.” He said, “This is the Torah and the Prophets.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Golden Rule echoes a maxim of Hillel the Elder who lived a generation before the Master. In a famous story in the Talmud, Hillel claimed that the Golden Rule summarized the whole Torah: ⠀⠀⠀⠀ // On another occasion a certain Gentile came to Shammai and said to him, “Make me into a Jewish convert, but teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot.” Immediately Shammai drove him away with the measuring stick which was in his hand. When the same Gentile went before Hillel with the same proposition, Hillel said to him, “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor. That is the whole Torah, while the rest is the commentary on it. Now go and study it.” // (b.Shabbat 31a) ⠀⠀⠀⠀ Rabbi Hillel used the Golden Rule to summarize the essence of the Torah, not to replace it. Ditto Rabbi Yeshua and Paul when he says, “If there is any other commandment, it is summed up in this saying, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the Torah”. Paul did not mean that Leviticus 19:18 replaced the other commandments. The apostolic community transmitted the Golden Rule in direct conjunction with Leviticus 19:18: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself, and whatever you would not want to happen to you, do not do to another” (Didache 1:2). ⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the article)

Golden Rule vs. The Torah
(via FFoZ.org)
⠀⠀⠀
Rabbi Yeshua told His disciples that the Golden Rule “is the Torah and the Prophets.” In other words, it expresses the ethical core behind the message of the whole Bible.
⠀⠀⠀
Bible teachers sometimes suppose that the Master meant that the Golden Rule replaces the Law. They use Matthew 7:12 as an escape clause from the other commandments of the Torah. That is to say, if a man simply does to others what he would have them do to him, he need not concern himself with the specifics of the commandments. According to this idea, Yeshua abolished the Torah and replaced it with this shorter, easier-to-remember formula.
⠀⠀⠀⠀
On the contrary, the Master did not say, “This replaces the Torah and the Prophets.” He said, “This is the Torah and the Prophets.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Golden Rule echoes a maxim of Hillel the Elder who lived a generation before the Master. In a famous story in the Talmud, Hillel claimed that the Golden Rule summarized the whole Torah:
⠀⠀⠀⠀
// On another occasion a certain Gentile came to Shammai and said to him, “Make me into a Jewish convert, but teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot.” Immediately Shammai drove him away with the measuring stick which was in his hand. When the same Gentile went before Hillel with the same proposition, Hillel said to him, “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor. That is the whole Torah, while the rest is the commentary on it. Now go and study it.” // (b.Shabbat 31a)
⠀⠀⠀⠀
Rabbi Hillel used the Golden Rule to summarize the essence of the Torah, not to replace it. Ditto Rabbi Yeshua and Paul when he says, “If there is any other commandment, it is summed up in this saying, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the Torah”. Paul did not mean that Leviticus 19:18 replaced the other commandments. The apostolic community transmitted the Golden Rule in direct conjunction with Leviticus 19:18: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself, and whatever you would not want to happen to you, do not do to another” (Didache 1:2).
⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the article)

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  • @andrewjmck45 (9 h)
    For some reason I couldn't see the full article until now. Reading now @holylanguage
     
  • @holylanguage (12 h)
    @andrewjmck45 Have you checked out the full article? FFOZ are generally pretty clear with their messages. If you have, I can try, but you'll have to be more clear in what you'd like explained more :)
     
  • @andrewjmck45 (1 day)
    Can you explain more of that ☝️?
     
 

2017-03-28 02:53:30

A year ago, we began writing for this blog, a dream, a team and a “whole lotta” love. It is really amazing to me how much my own personal encounter with Yeshua has taken on a depth and a richness this past year, that is difficult to articulate, yet palatable, nonetheless. And I owe this blog, and it's faithful readers a debt of gratitude. I don’t have a degree in psychology, but I know from experience that I learn so much more by sharing what I have learned...haha, if that makes sense. They call it “Teaching to Learn” I think, and it is the act of creating rhetoric, re-telling the story, internalizing the lesson enough to make it your own and pass it along...this is what you have done for me this past year. And the things we HAVEN’T written about (or at least not yet), the untold stories of victory and defeat. The battlelines in the spirit, the tears, the lessons in humility....the volumes of things we as a tribe are doing for the Glory of Hashem, in the merit of Yeshua....these are the untold annals of our King. And yet, we stand at the precipice of time, approaching the feasts anew, with expectation, and excitement, and sometimes with a sense of drudgery. This year, I want to turn my voice to speak to those among us who have had your first hand at battle this past year. When the armies of Pharaoh hunted us down in the night, and you trembled in fear....He was there. When we complained because we had nowhere to turn, He had a plan. When we lost all hope, because the sea had us cornered, He knew the way through. And despite all the miracles He has displayed before us, for us, and has in store for us....we still miss a beat sometimes, and worry in the place where our faith should be. (I do it, too.) Here, at the precipice of time, here at the foot of the promised land, He is calling us again. Do you hear your name being called out? What is it that He WANTS from us? What could He possibly need? He has everything in this world, in the universe, and more. What Does He Want? ...read “What’s Your Story?” by going holylanguage.com > resources > blog, or by clicking through the link in our bio to our Facebook page.

A year ago, we began writing for this blog, a dream, a team and a “whole lotta” love. It is really amazing to me how much my own personal encounter with Yeshua has taken on a depth and a richness this past year, that is difficult to articulate, yet palatable, nonetheless.

And I owe this blog, and it's faithful readers a debt of gratitude. I don’t have a degree in psychology, but I know from experience that I learn so much more by sharing what I have learned...haha, if that makes sense. They call it “Teaching to Learn” I think, and it is the act of creating rhetoric, re-telling the story, internalizing the lesson enough to make it your own and pass it along...this is what you have done for me this past year.

And the things we HAVEN’T written about (or at least not yet), the untold stories of victory and defeat. The battlelines in the spirit, the tears, the lessons in humility....the volumes of things we as a tribe are doing for the Glory of Hashem, in the merit of Yeshua....these are the untold annals of our King.

And yet, we stand at the precipice of time, approaching the feasts anew, with expectation, and excitement, and sometimes with a sense of drudgery.

This year, I want to turn my voice to speak to those among us who have had your first hand at battle this past year. When the armies of Pharaoh hunted us down in the night, and you trembled in fear....He was there.

When we complained because we had nowhere to turn, He had a plan.

When we lost all hope, because the sea had us cornered, He knew the way through.

And despite all the miracles He has displayed before us, for us, and has in store for us....we still miss a beat sometimes, and worry in the place where our faith should be. (I do it, too.) Here, at the precipice of time, here at the foot of the promised land, He is calling us again. Do you hear your name being called out? What is it that He WANTS from us? What could He possibly need? He has everything in this world, in the universe, and more. What Does He Want? ...read “What’s Your Story?” by going holylanguage.com > resources > blog, or by clicking through the link in our bio to our Facebook page.

86 2

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  • @holylanguage (12 h)
    Try us and see, if nothing else it could encourage someone else who also checks us out :)
     
  • You would never get it. Doubt you'd believe it either.
     
 

2017-03-28 02:21:36

Shalom, Jonathan here! Watch our newest "fun emoji Hebrew Scriptures" lesson reading through Exodus 4:13 by clicking through our bio link to this post on our Facebook page! See you there! ❤

Shalom, Jonathan here! Watch our newest "fun emoji Hebrew Scriptures" lesson reading through Exodus 4:13 by clicking through our bio link to this post on our Facebook page! See you there!
❤

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2017-03-27 17:40:10

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ A Farewell to the Emmaus Road (via www.jerusalemperspective.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Emmaus Road narrative is the climax of Luke’s Gospel. In it, two of Jesus’ disciples encounter their resurrected Lord as they follow the road leading west from Jerusalem. Not only do the hearts of the disciples burn as they speak with their risen Master, the hearts of the readers burn as well, since, unlike the disciples, we know that it is Jesus himself who is accompanying them as the disciples relate the sad tale of how all their hopes for the redemption of Israel were dashed when Jesus was crucified outside the walls of the holy city. Readers feel almost as if they were present with the disciples on the road as Jesus walked and spoke with them. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Despite the importance of this story and its location for Jesus’ followers living in Israel today as well as for modern-day pilgrims who visit the land of the Bible, little has been done to preserve the ancient remains of a Roman road that are still visible in the area where Jesus traveled with two of his disciples on the day of his resurrection. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Identifying the village Luke referred to as Ἐμμαοῦς (Emmaous) has challenged ancient pilgrims as well as modern scholars. At least two sites bore the name Ἀμμαοῦς (Ammaous)—a slight variation in spelling from the name recorded in Luke’s Gospel—in the land of Israel during the Second Temple period. The book of 1 Maccabees mentions a location called Emmaus, which was situated near the topographical boundary between the Shephelah and the coastal plain (1 Macc. 3:40). Josephus referred to this Emmaus as a πόλις (polis, “city”), a term normally reserved for a large and well-organized population center. Perhaps this city ought to be identified with the אַמְאוּס (’am’ūs, “Emmaus”) mentioned in rabbinic sources which is described as having a market (m. Ker. 3:7).The city was later renamed Nicopolis in the third century C.E.[6] After the Byzantine Empire lost control of the Holy Land, Nicopolis reverted to the name ‘Imwas (derived from Emmaus) among the Arabic speakers who lived in the area. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A Farewell to the Emmaus Road
(via www.jerusalemperspective.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Emmaus Road narrative is the climax of Luke’s Gospel. In it, two of Jesus’ disciples encounter their resurrected Lord as they follow the road leading west from Jerusalem. Not only do the hearts of the disciples burn as they speak with their risen Master, the hearts of the readers burn as well, since, unlike the disciples, we know that it is Jesus himself who is accompanying them as the disciples relate the sad tale of how all their hopes for the redemption of Israel were dashed when Jesus was crucified outside the walls of the holy city. Readers feel almost as if they were present with the disciples on the road as Jesus walked and spoke with them.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Despite the importance of this story and its location for Jesus’ followers living in Israel today as well as for modern-day pilgrims who visit the land of the Bible, little has been done to preserve the ancient remains of a Roman road that are still visible in the area where Jesus traveled with two of his disciples on the day of his resurrection.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Identifying the village Luke referred to as Ἐμμαοῦς (Emmaous) has challenged ancient pilgrims as well as modern scholars. At least two sites bore the name Ἀμμαοῦς (Ammaous)—a slight variation in spelling from the name recorded in Luke’s Gospel—in the land of Israel during the Second Temple period. The book of 1 Maccabees mentions a location called Emmaus, which was situated near the topographical boundary between the Shephelah and the coastal plain (1 Macc. 3:40). Josephus referred to this Emmaus as a πόλις (polis, “city”), a term normally reserved for a large and well-organized population center. Perhaps this city ought to be identified with the אַמְאוּס (’am’ūs, “Emmaus”) mentioned in rabbinic sources which is described as having a market (m. Ker. 3:7).The city was later renamed Nicopolis in the third century C.E.[6] After the Byzantine Empire lost control of the Holy Land, Nicopolis reverted to the name ‘Imwas (derived from Emmaus) among the Arabic speakers who lived in the area.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article)

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2017-03-27 15:18:30

Q: What Is G‑d? A: The Not-thing (via chabad.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ One concept learners of language eventually come to realise is that language is deeply connected to abstract thought. You have an inner-voice that speaks your native language (usually in your own voice and can possibly speak in any language you learn). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The language you think *with* defines the limits of what you can think *about*. (Which is why we say learning Hebrew helps you follow Yeshua in a Hebrew way.) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This is a very interesting perspective on how our language has deep implications on how we think of the reality and nature of God. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the article)

Q: What Is G‑d? A: The Not-thing
(via chabad.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
One concept learners of language eventually come to realise is that language is deeply connected to abstract thought. You have an inner-voice that speaks your native language (usually in your own voice and can possibly speak in any language you learn).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The language you think *with* defines the limits of what you can think *about*. (Which is why we say learning Hebrew helps you follow Yeshua in a Hebrew way.)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This is a very interesting perspective on how our language has deep implications on how we think of the reality and nature of God.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the article)

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  • @hijoverdadero (1 day)
    I love what you teach! Shalom from Venezuela
     
  • @missiboyd (2 days)
    The Creator of Heaven and Earth
     
 

2017-03-27 03:14:30

Here's what you'll get in our newest Hebrew Verses study! ~A rant about end-times hype versus the fundamentals of discipleship ~How justification by faith changed Izzy's grandfather's life ~"Understanding" this Hebrew word will make your relationships waaay better ~The first time praise is mentioned it's men talking about a gorgeous woman ~Example of the difference between Delitzsch and Salkinson's NT translations WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/verses or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Hebrew Verses

Here's what you'll get in our newest Hebrew Verses study!
~A rant about end-times hype versus the fundamentals of discipleship
~How justification by faith changed Izzy's grandfather's life
~"Understanding" this Hebrew word will make your relationships waaay better
~The first time praise is mentioned it's men talking about a gorgeous woman
~Example of the difference between Delitzsch and Salkinson's NT translations
WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/verses or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Hebrew Verses

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2017-03-26 18:21:38

Daniel is following Yeshua in a Hebrew way! Here’s his story! Hello tribe. I’ve been lurking for quite a while and finally took the plunge to join. I would like to share the Reader's Digest version of my life from a spiritual perspective. In high school, I had a friend who was into metaphysics. She gave me a book to read. It was about a college professor who was seeking “enlightenment” through drugs and psychedelic mushrooms. I closed the book and immediately became an atheist. I have always valued my mind and logic and if this is what a person does who seeks “enlightenment” I wanted no part of it. My theology became those who believed in a god were insecure. They were just looking for an explanation of how they got here and where they were going to go when they died. I never believed in evolution because you can’t get something from nothing, but I was able to accept the fact that I didn’t know how I got here and I might find out at some point in time. I had studied many religions in college, they were all pretty foolish. Because I was forced to go to church as a kid in High School, I knew a lot so when I went to college, my friends thought I was a Christian because of what I knew. They never caught it when I said, “your god” during our many conversations. I ended up buying a $7 Bible with money I didn’t even have in my checkbook. After my roommate went to bed, I turned on the desk lamp and started reading in John per all of my friends' recommendations. That first night, G-d spoke to me in my spirit. He said, “I just might be real.” I literally shook my head to clear my mind. It kind of freaked me out. I turned off my desk lamp and went to bed. The next night, I continued where I left off and then I heard G-d again. He said, “I am real.” I immediately believed and I believed all of it… ...click through our bio link to read the rest in this identical post on Facebook. #hebrew #bible #torah #messianic #israel #jewish #christian #yeshua #jesus

Daniel is following Yeshua in a Hebrew way! Here’s his story!

Hello tribe. I’ve been lurking for quite a while and finally took the plunge to join. I would like to share the Reader's Digest version of my life from a spiritual perspective.

In high school, I had a friend who was into metaphysics. She gave me a book to read. It was about a college professor who was seeking “enlightenment” through drugs and psychedelic mushrooms. I closed the book and immediately became an atheist. I have always valued my mind and logic and if this is what a person does who seeks “enlightenment” I wanted no part of it.

My theology became those who believed in a god were insecure. They were just looking for an explanation of how they got here and where they were going to go when they died. I never believed in evolution because you can’t get something from nothing, but I was able to accept the fact that I didn’t know how I got here and I might find out at some point in time.

I had studied many religions in college, they were all pretty foolish. Because I was forced to go to church as a kid in High School, I knew a lot so when I went to college, my friends thought I was a Christian because of what I knew. They never caught it when I said, “your god” during our many conversations.

I ended up buying a $7 Bible with money I didn’t even have in my checkbook. After my roommate went to bed, I turned on the desk lamp and started reading in John per all of my friends' recommendations. That first night, G-d spoke to me in my spirit. He said, “I just might be real.” I literally shook my head to clear my mind. It kind of freaked me out. I turned off my desk lamp and went to bed. The next night, I continued where I left off and then I heard G-d again. He said, “I am real.” I immediately believed and I believed all of it… ...click through our bio link to read the rest in this identical post on Facebook.
 #hebrew #bible #torah #messianic #israel #jewish #christian #yeshua #jesus

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2017-03-26 15:09:46

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Watch: Hebrew 101, lessons for beginners... it may be confusing (via live.jpost.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Just about every English-speaker who has tried to learn Hebrew has stumbled over some of the confusing words beginners need to pick up. "Mi" in Hebrew means who, "he" means she, "hoo" means he and "ma" means what. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Did you get that? Didn't think so. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Neither do Jewish comedian Elon Gold and his daughter, in a new video created in collaboration with StandWithUs. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Gold "plays" an impatient Israeli Hebrew teacher trying to impart the list of new words to Emily, Gold's 7-year-old daughter. By the end he tells her "die" - i.e. enough in Hebrew, but a jarring instruction in English! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 90-second video pays homage to the famous "Who's On First" sketch first performed by comedians Abbott and Costello in the 1930s. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to watch the funny video)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Watch: Hebrew 101, lessons for beginners... it may be confusing
(via live.jpost.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Just about every English-speaker who has tried to learn Hebrew has stumbled over some of the confusing words beginners need to pick up. "Mi" in Hebrew means who, "he" means she, "hoo" means he and "ma" means what. ⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Did you get that? Didn't think so. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Neither do Jewish comedian Elon Gold and his daughter, in a new video created in collaboration with StandWithUs.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Gold "plays" an impatient Israeli Hebrew teacher trying to impart the list of new words to Emily, Gold's 7-year-old daughter. By the end he tells her "die" - i.e. enough in Hebrew, but a jarring instruction in English! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The 90-second video pays homage to the famous "Who's On First" sketch first performed by comedians Abbott and Costello in the 1930s. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to watch the funny video)

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2017-03-26 13:38:51

The Biblical Tongue Reborn Review: Lewis Glinert, 'The Story of Hebrew' by David Isaac freebeacon.com ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ "The restoration of Hebrew," writes Lewis Glinert, professor of Hebrew studies at Dartmouth College, "was an act without precedent in linguistic and sociopolitical history." And as his valuable new book, The Story of Hebrew, demonstrates, it was a conscious decision by Jews who decided that if they were going to make it out of the Diaspora, their language was going to make it, too. So successful were the "guardians of Hebrew's textual memory," that when the time came to restore Hebrew as a spoken tongue after two millennia, they did so, in Glinert's words, "almost overnight." ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The importance Jews accorded to Hebrew explains the great lengths they went to preserve it. The principal method was the study of Hebrew texts. Glinert writes that "The day when Bible study became pivotal to Jewish life" was the day Ezra the Scribe read from the Bible in a Jerusalem square, as described in the book of Nehemiah. Ezra had led a group of Jews back from Babylonia around 458 B.C., over a hundred years after the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple and exiled most of the country's inhabitants. "[I]t's hard to imagine what would have become of the Bible without Ezra," Glinert says. Nehemiah was equally committed, judging from his fury at coming across non-Hebrew speaking Judeans in the city of Ashdod: "And I contended with them and cursed them and beat some of them and pulled out their hair." ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Far more threatening to Hebrew would be the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans. In 135 A.D., Rome smashed the Bar Kochba revolt, the final Jewish rebellion against its rule. One million Jews were sold as slaves, with a remnant fleeing Judea. Exactly how many Hebrew speakers remained is unknown, and was perhaps in the tens of thousands. "By any sociolinguistic yardstick, the prospects of native Hebrew's survival were now minimal," Glinert says. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yet, Hebrew did survive. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio for the full article)

The Biblical Tongue Reborn
Review: Lewis Glinert, 'The Story of Hebrew'
by David Isaac
freebeacon.com
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
"The restoration of Hebrew," writes Lewis Glinert, professor of Hebrew studies at Dartmouth College, "was an act without precedent in linguistic and sociopolitical history." And as his valuable new book, The Story of Hebrew, demonstrates, it was a conscious decision by Jews who decided that if they were going to make it out of the Diaspora, their language was going to make it, too. So successful were the "guardians of Hebrew's textual memory," that when the time came to restore Hebrew as a spoken tongue after two millennia, they did so, in Glinert's words, "almost overnight."
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The importance Jews accorded to Hebrew explains the great lengths they went to preserve it. The principal method was the study of Hebrew texts. Glinert writes that "The day when Bible study became pivotal to Jewish life" was the day Ezra the Scribe read from the Bible in a Jerusalem square, as described in the book of Nehemiah. Ezra had led a group of Jews back from Babylonia around 458 B.C., over a hundred years after the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple and exiled most of the country's inhabitants. "[I]t's hard to imagine what would have become of the Bible without Ezra," Glinert says. Nehemiah was equally committed, judging from his fury at coming across non-Hebrew speaking Judeans in the city of Ashdod: "And I contended with them and cursed them and beat some of them and pulled out their hair."
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Far more threatening to Hebrew would be the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans. In 135 A.D., Rome smashed the Bar Kochba revolt, the final Jewish rebellion against its rule. One million Jews were sold as slaves, with a remnant fleeing Judea. Exactly how many Hebrew speakers remained is unknown, and was perhaps in the tens of thousands. "By any sociolinguistic yardstick, the prospects of native Hebrew's survival were now minimal," Glinert says.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yet, Hebrew did survive. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio for the full article)

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2017-03-26 03:13:54

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Eight Connections between the Red Heifer and Redemption (via ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ It is a bizarre and arcane ritual. The priests slaughter and burn a completely red cow. They combine the ashes with water. When a person is contaminated with impurity though contact with the dead, the priests sprinkle this water upon them, and the impurity is removed. Yet those involved with the preparation of this water become impure. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This peculiar commandment is not merely an obscure and irrelevant detail of the Torah. In a way, it represents the essence of the Torah itself and reveals deep secrets about the ultimate redemption and the coming of Messiah. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As the month of Nisan approaches, in our synagogues we read several special passages important for the season. One of these readings is the passage regarding the red heifer. In Hebrew, this offering is called the parah adumah, meaning “red cow” or “red heifer.” The biblical passage is referred to as Parashat Parah, and the Sabbath on which it is read is called Shabbat Parah. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This passage draws to our attention that the Messiah himself is near and the ultimate redemption of Israel and the world. Here are eight ways in which the red cow relates to the ultimate Messianic redemption. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 1. The Tenth Red Heifer 2. The Prophetic Cleansing 3. Preparation for Redemption 4. Restoration from Death 5. Ingathering 6. The revealing of mysteries 7. Rectification from sin 8. Atonement and the tzaddik The sages in the Gemara asked, “Why is the passage about the death of Miriam juxtaposed to the passage about the red heifer? This teaches us that just as the red heifer brings atonement, the death of the righteous also bring atonement.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Atonement—kapparah—closes the distance between God’s presence and us. We long for the day when God’s presence is restored to earth in a complete way by the power of Yeshua the Messiah.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read details of each connection in the full article)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Eight Connections between the Red Heifer and Redemption
(via ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
It is a bizarre and arcane ritual. The priests slaughter and burn a completely red cow. They combine the ashes with water. When a person is contaminated with impurity though contact with the dead, the priests sprinkle this water upon them, and the impurity is removed. Yet those involved with the preparation of this water become impure.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This peculiar commandment is not merely an obscure and irrelevant detail of the Torah. In a way, it represents the essence of the Torah itself and reveals deep secrets about the ultimate redemption and the coming of Messiah.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As the month of Nisan approaches, in our synagogues we read several special passages important for the season. One of these readings is the passage regarding the red heifer. In Hebrew, this offering is called the parah adumah, meaning “red cow” or “red heifer.” The biblical passage is referred to as Parashat Parah, and the Sabbath on which it is read is called Shabbat Parah.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This passage draws to our attention that the Messiah himself is near and the ultimate redemption of Israel and the world. Here are eight ways in which the red cow relates to the ultimate Messianic redemption.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1. The Tenth Red Heifer
2. The Prophetic Cleansing
3. Preparation for Redemption
4. Restoration from Death
5. Ingathering
6. The revealing of mysteries
7. Rectification from sin
8. Atonement and the tzaddik
The sages in the Gemara asked, “Why is the passage about the death of Miriam juxtaposed to the passage about the red heifer? This teaches us that just as the red heifer brings atonement, the death of the righteous also bring atonement.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Atonement—kapparah—closes the distance between God’s presence and us. We long for the day when God’s presence is restored to earth in a complete way by the power of Yeshua the Messiah.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read details of each connection in the full article)

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2017-03-24 10:13:09

 

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