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  • bio: We're a global tribe following Yeshua of Nazareth in a Hebrew way at holylanguage.com. I'm Adi, the volunteer meeting your Insta needs. 😉
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Izzy here. My friend Gidon Ariel of RootSource fame recently tipped me off to this website. Throw in your Hebrew texts, and out comes this transliteration! Try for yourself here: http://alittlehebrew.com/transliterate/ (You can also find it by Googling "Hebrew Transliteration".) Say thanks to Gidon at www.root-source.com. And if you have any resources you'd like to tell the Holy Language tribe about, we'd be happy to pass them on for you. Just send us a note through the contact page at holylanguage.com.

Izzy here. My friend Gidon Ariel of RootSource fame recently tipped me off to this website. Throw in your Hebrew texts, and out comes this transliteration! Try for yourself here: http://alittlehebrew.com/transliterate/ (You can also find it by Googling "Hebrew Transliteration".) Say thanks to Gidon at www.root-source.com. And if you have any resources you'd like to tell the Holy Language tribe about, we'd be happy to pass them on for you. Just send us a note through the contact page at holylanguage.com.

78 5

 
 

2017-01-16 18:09:05

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ One million and one ways to celebrate (via lv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This week we’re celebrating 1 million downloads – can you believe it? Let’s celebrate together! In Hebrew of course, and talk about the root ‘hagag,’ חגג, and how we use it. By the way, the cake tasted amazing. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Words and expressions discussed: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Anachnu hogegim – We are celebrating – אנחנו חוגגים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Lahgog mashehu – To celebrate something – לחגוג משהו ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hogegim yomuledet le-mishehu – Celebrating birthday for someone – חוגגים יומולדת למישהו ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hagiga – Celebration, party – חגיגה ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hagagnu ad or ha-boker – We celebrated until dawn – חגגנו עד אור הבוקר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hagiga Ba-snooker – Party at the snooker – חגיגה בסנוקר ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hag – Holiday – חג ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hag sameach – Happy holiday – חג שמח ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hajj (Arabic) – حج – חג’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Nira li mishu hogeg li al ha-kartis – I think that someone is “feasting” on my credit card – נראה לי מישהו חוגג לי על הכרטיס ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Ani hoshev she-mishehu hogeg li al ha-pelefon – I think that someone is “feasting” on my phone – אני חושב שמישהו חוגג לי על הפלאפון ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Bon’a, ata hogeg/at hogeget/atem hogegim – Dude, you live the life – בוא’נה, אתה חוגג/את חוגגת/אתם חוגגים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Hagiga la-einayim – Site for sore eyes – חגיגה לעיניים ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click our BIO link to listen to the podcast.)

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One million and one ways to celebrate (via lv1.fm/streetwise-hebrew)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This week we’re celebrating 1 million downloads – can you believe it? Let’s celebrate together! In Hebrew of course, and talk about the root ‘hagag,’ חגג, and how we use it. By the way, the cake tasted amazing.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Words and expressions discussed:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Anachnu hogegim – We are celebrating – אנחנו חוגגים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Lahgog mashehu – To celebrate something – לחגוג משהו
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Hogegim yomuledet le-mishehu – Celebrating birthday for someone – חוגגים יומולדת למישהו
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Hagiga – Celebration, party – חגיגה
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Hagagnu ad or ha-boker – We celebrated until dawn – חגגנו עד אור הבוקר
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Hagiga Ba-snooker – Party at the snooker – חגיגה בסנוקר
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Hag – Holiday – חג
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Hag sameach – Happy holiday – חג שמח
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Hajj (Arabic) – حج – חג’
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Nira li mishu hogeg li al ha-kartis – I think that someone is “feasting” on my credit card – נראה לי מישהו חוגג לי על הכרטיס
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Ani hoshev she-mishehu hogeg li al ha-pelefon – I think that someone is “feasting” on my phone – אני חושב שמישהו חוגג לי על הפלאפון
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Bon’a, ata hogeg/at hogeget/atem hogegim – Dude, you live the life – בוא’נה, אתה חוגג/את חוגגת/אתם חוגגים
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Hagiga la-einayim – Site for sore eyes – חגיגה לעיניים
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(Click our BIO link to listen to the podcast.)

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2017-01-16 14:29:08

Ask the Expert: Graven Images - Is it okay to paint or sculpt the human form? (via myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Question: I have a sister who is a successful artist, and draws the human form. I’m worried that she might be violating the second commandment. What are the rules in Judaism about creating images of people? –Lori, California ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Answer: Well color me excited, Lori. This gives me an opportunity to talk about one of my favorite subjects: art! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As you correctly pointed out, the second of the Ten Commandments has to do with creating artwork, idols, or icons that represent living beings or celestial objects. The text says, “You shall have no other gods beside Me. You shall not make for yourself a sculptured image, or any likeness of what is in the heavens above or on the earth below, or in the waters under the earth.” (Exodus 20:3-4) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Over time, this commandment has been interpreted in a variety of ways. The most common prohibition, and the one that’s most obvious from the text, is against creating sculptures of people, animals, or planets for the purpose of worshipping them. One of the primary messages of the Torah is that worshipping idols is not allowed, so it’s not surprising that creating pieces of art that could be used as idols was prohibited. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You asked specifically about drawing the human form, so I’ll give you a bit more history on how that issue is treated in rabbinic literature. The Talmud comments on the second commandment, and takes a very strict stance against producing images of faces, ruling it forbidden, but sanctioning owning images of faces that were created by non-Jews (Avodah Zara 43a). The prohibition comes from a concern that even two dimensional images could be worshipped, or could represent idols. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click our BIO link to read the full article)

Ask the Expert: Graven Images - Is it okay to paint or sculpt the human form?
(via myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Question: I have a sister who is a successful artist, and draws the human form. I’m worried that she might be violating the second commandment. What are the rules in Judaism about creating images of people?
–Lori, California
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Answer: Well color me excited, Lori. This gives me an opportunity to talk about one of my favorite subjects: art!
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As you correctly pointed out, the second of the Ten Commandments has to do with creating artwork, idols, or icons that represent living beings or celestial objects. The text says, “You shall have no other gods beside Me. You shall not make for yourself a sculptured image, or any likeness of what is in the heavens above or on the earth below, or in the waters under the earth.” (Exodus 20:3-4)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Over time, this commandment has been interpreted in a variety of ways. The most common prohibition, and the one that’s most obvious from the text, is against creating sculptures of people, animals, or planets for the purpose of worshipping them. One of the primary messages of the Torah is that worshipping idols is not allowed, so it’s not surprising that creating pieces of art that could be used as idols was prohibited.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
You asked specifically about drawing the human form, so I’ll give you a bit more history on how that issue is treated in rabbinic literature. The Talmud comments on the second commandment, and takes a very strict stance against producing images of faces, ruling it forbidden, but sanctioning owning images of faces that were created by non-Jews (Avodah Zara 43a). The prohibition comes from a concern that even two dimensional images could be worshipped, or could represent idols. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click our BIO link to read the full article)

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2017-01-16 02:47:27

Here's what you'll get in our newest Hebrew Verses study! ~Praying and reading the Hebrew Bible with Izzy ~Why are these Hebrew words for food related to violence and fighting? ~Judaism believes in two Messiahs and the first is the Son of Joseph ~Joseph's story is a picture of Yeshua in UNCANNY ways ~How to turn the most boring Bible passages into the best experiences WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/verses or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Hebrew Verses

Here's what you'll get in our newest Hebrew Verses study!
~Praying and reading the Hebrew Bible with Izzy
~Why are these Hebrew words for food related to violence and fighting?
~Judaism believes in two Messiahs and the first is the Son of Joseph
~Joseph's story is a picture of Yeshua in UNCANNY ways
~How to turn the most boring Bible passages into the best experiences
WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/verses or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Hebrew Verses

76 3

 
 

2017-01-15 23:08:37

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Let No One Judge You (via ffoz.org Aaron Eby) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Paul is often accused of teaching that the Torah’s commands—especially dietary laws and calendar observances—are not incumbent upon a follower of Yeshua, whether Jew or Gentile. However, mistaken assumptions about Paul can lead to dramatically incorrect readings. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In my book Biblically Kosher, I address many passages that are commonly interpreted as a rejection of the dietary laws. I find that when Paul is seen as a faithful and observant Jew, his brilliant teachings inspire us to pursue Torah with joy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This passage from Colossians is a perfect example of such a commonly misunderstood teaching: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Christ. (Colossians 2:16-17) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ According to conventional Christian interpretations of this passage, Paul was advising the Colossians to defy anyone who instructed them to observe the Torah’s laws about food, Sabbaths, and holidays. For example, the ESV Study Bible remarks on verse 17 that “Christians are no longer obligated to observe OT dietary laws (‘food and drink’) or festivals, holidays, and special days (‘a festival…new moon…Sabbath’), for what these things foreshadowed has been fulfilled in Christ.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This explanation raises a difficulty. How is “they are a shadow of Messiah” a reason not to observe? Are the Colossians then better off with no holidays whatsoever, or with idolatrous or secular festivals that have no connection to the Messiah? Imagine me telling my children, “No building a sukkah this year. No Passover Seder. Jesus came and took all that away.” They would look at me like I’m the Grinch! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In context, we can see that Paul is criticizing the practice and ideology of asceticism, which is the belief that by denying oneself food and physical comforts, one is able to gain supernatural revelation. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click our BIO link to read the full article)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Let No One Judge You (via ffoz.org Aaron Eby)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Paul is often accused of teaching that the Torah’s commands—especially dietary laws and calendar observances—are not incumbent upon a follower of Yeshua, whether Jew or Gentile. However, mistaken assumptions about Paul can lead to dramatically incorrect readings.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In my book Biblically Kosher, I address many passages that are commonly interpreted as a rejection of the dietary laws. I find that when Paul is seen as a faithful and observant Jew, his brilliant teachings inspire us to pursue Torah with joy.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This passage from Colossians is a perfect example of such a commonly misunderstood teaching:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Christ. (Colossians 2:16-17)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
According to conventional Christian interpretations of this passage, Paul was advising the Colossians to defy anyone who instructed them to observe the Torah’s laws about food, Sabbaths, and holidays. For example, the ESV Study Bible remarks on verse 17 that “Christians are no longer obligated to observe OT dietary laws (‘food and drink’) or festivals, holidays, and special days (‘a festival…new moon…Sabbath’), for what these things foreshadowed has been fulfilled in Christ.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This explanation raises a difficulty. How is “they are a shadow of Messiah” a reason not to observe? Are the Colossians then better off with no holidays whatsoever, or with idolatrous or secular festivals that have no connection to the Messiah? Imagine me telling my children, “No building a sukkah this year. No Passover Seder. Jesus came and took all that away.” They would look at me like I’m the Grinch!
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In context, we can see that Paul is criticizing the practice and ideology of asceticism, which is the belief that by denying oneself food and physical comforts, one is able to gain supernatural revelation. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click our BIO link to read the full article)

100 4

 
 

2017-01-15 13:09:28

Model of Jerusalem to be displayed in Times Square (via ynetnews.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ A giant model of Jerusalem featuring the Temple Mount, the Tower of David, the Knesset, the new Jerusalem Light Rail and the soon-to-be-completed pyramid skyscraper, will be placed in Times Square in New York as part of the Gulliver's Gate "mini-world" project. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 100-square-meter model was designed and constructed by Israeli company Mathov Designs. The model will be shipped to New York in three weeks in three shipping containers, where it will be rebuilt by the company. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ "The project was initiated by a group of people who rented two huge floors in a building in Times Square, where they plan to create a permanent tourist attraction—a miniature world," said Gadi Ma-Tov, the founder of Mathov Designs. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ "The idea is to show old and new Jerusalem. We built models of the pyramid building on Eden Street which is still under construction and the old train station. It's not an exact model of the city," he said. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In addition to the aforementioned sites, the model also features the Cedar Valley, the new high-speed train bridges, the old Arab village of Lifta, the Chords Bridge, Mahane Yehuda Market, the entrance to the city, the Nahlaot neighborhood, the Nahalat Shiv'a neighborhood, the Russian Church of Mary Magdalene, the Italian Hospital and the Supreme Court. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to see the full article.)

Model of Jerusalem to be displayed in Times Square
(via ynetnews.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A giant model of Jerusalem featuring the Temple Mount, the Tower of David, the Knesset, the new Jerusalem Light Rail and the soon-to-be-completed pyramid skyscraper, will be placed in Times Square in New York as part of the Gulliver's Gate "mini-world" project.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The 100-square-meter model was designed and constructed by Israeli company Mathov Designs. The model will be shipped to New York in three weeks in three shipping containers, where it will be rebuilt by the company.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
"The project was initiated by a group of people who rented two huge floors in a building in Times Square, where they plan to create a permanent tourist attraction—a miniature world," said Gadi Ma-Tov, the founder of Mathov Designs.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
"The idea is to show old and new Jerusalem. We built models of the pyramid building on Eden Street which is still under construction and the old train station. It's not an exact model of the city," he said.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In addition to the aforementioned sites, the model also features the Cedar Valley, the new high-speed train bridges, the old Arab village of Lifta, the Chords Bridge, Mahane Yehuda Market, the entrance to the city, the Nahlaot neighborhood, the Nahalat Shiv'a neighborhood, the Russian Church of Mary Magdalene, the Italian Hospital and the Supreme Court.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to see the full article.)

197 7

 
 

2017-01-15 03:07:07

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Highlights of the Shabbat Morning Synagogue Service (via www.myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Shema (“Hear O Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord is One”) This passage from the Book of Deuteronomy and the three passages that follow constitute a central part of each morning and evening Jewish prayer service. Probably the most important single sentence in the liturgy, the Shema is not a prayer but rather an affirmation of the unity of God. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Amidah (“Standing Prayer”) The Amidah, a series of prayers recited while standing in silent meditation, is the major liturgical piece of every synagogue service throughout the year. On a weekday, the Amidah contains prayers for the physical and spiritual well-being of the one praying as well as of the entire community of the people of Israel. On Shabbat, we praise God for the joy of the Shabbat and the rest that we enjoy. It is perfectly acceptable and even desirable that people recite the Amidah in English, and worshippers are also encouraged to pray from their hearts if the printed words do not speak to them. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Torah Blessings (Aliyot to the Torah) On Shabbat, the weekly Torah portion is read in seven sections. Each division of the reading provides an opportunity to honor a member of the congregation or a guest by calling him or her (just him in traditionalist communities) up to the bimah (pulpit) to recite the blessings over the Torah reading. This is known as “receiving an aliyah,” that is, “being called up” to the Torah. At the conclusion of the Torah reading, two people are called to lift up and wrap the Torah scroll. The lifting displays the open Torah scroll to the congregation, showing symbolically that the Torah is an open book and belongs to everyone. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Haftarah... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Mourner’s Kaddish... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Kiddush (Sanctification of the Wine) At the end of service, all are invited to the social hall for kiddush, the blessing over the wine; a Shabbat song; and the hamotzi, the blessing over the bread, followed by a festive light luncheon (which is often referred to as “the kiddush.”) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click our BIO link to read the full article)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Highlights of the Shabbat Morning Synagogue Service
(via www.myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Shema (“Hear O Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord is One”)
This passage from the Book of Deuteronomy and the three passages that follow constitute a central part of each morning and evening Jewish prayer service. Probably the most important single sentence in the liturgy, the Shema is not a prayer but rather an affirmation of the unity of God.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Amidah (“Standing Prayer”)
The Amidah, a series of prayers recited while standing in silent meditation, is the major liturgical piece of every synagogue service throughout the year. On a weekday, the Amidah contains prayers for the physical and spiritual well-being of the one praying as well as of the entire community of the people of Israel. On Shabbat, we praise God for the joy of the Shabbat and the rest that we enjoy. It is perfectly acceptable and even desirable that people recite the Amidah in English, and worshippers are also encouraged to pray from their hearts if the printed words do not speak to them.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Torah Blessings (Aliyot to the Torah)
On Shabbat, the weekly Torah portion is read in seven sections. Each division of the reading provides an opportunity to honor a member of the congregation or a guest by calling him or her (just him in traditionalist communities) up to the bimah (pulpit) to recite the blessings over the Torah reading. This is known as “receiving an aliyah,” that is, “being called up” to the Torah.
At the conclusion of the Torah reading, two people are called to lift up and wrap the Torah scroll. The lifting displays the open Torah scroll to the congregation, showing symbolically that the Torah is an open book and belongs to everyone.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Haftarah...
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Mourner’s Kaddish...
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Kiddush (Sanctification of the Wine)
At the end of service, all are invited to the social hall for kiddush, the blessing over the wine; a Shabbat song; and the hamotzi, the blessing over the bread, followed by a festive light luncheon (which is often referred to as “the kiddush.”)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click our BIO link to read the full article)

111 2

 
 

2017-01-13 12:15:47

A Little Word with a Big Meaning (via oneforisrael.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Have you ever wondered where the alphabet comes from? The first two letters of the Hebrew alphabet are “aleph” and “bet”. But it is the first letter and the last letter that are used to denote the alphabet in shorthand… as we might write “ABC” for our alphabet, in Hebrew, “את” can be used: the first letter “aleph” (א) and the last letter, “tav” (ת). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Together these two letters spell a little word, “et” (את), that cannot be translated into any language. It’s basically a way to link verbs and specific nouns, in a way unique to Hebrew. But this tiny word has a special purpose. We can see in the very first sentence of the Bible how full of meaning it can be. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This little word comes inbetween the action of creating and the heavens and the earth that were created. Rabbi Dov Ber explains the use of the word את in Genesis 1:1 in Or Torah,: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Et is an untranslatable word used to indicate that “a definite direct object is next” (so there needs to be an et before the heavens and the earth).” The Hebrew text literally reads: In the beginning, created God את the heavens and את the earth. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As “את” denotes the Hebrew alphabet, he reasons, “In the beginning God created the Aleph-Bet. Since God did this before creating the heavens and the earth, the letters are considered to be the primordial “building blocks” of all of creation.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ God created the capacity for words and language. And then he SPOKE all of creation into being with words. Which are formed with letters. Each aspect of creation was called into being with words from God, and today we speak of the the DNA ‘language’ that runs through creation. God not only gave us his word in the Scriptures, but he gave us his Word made flesh, who dwelt among us. And in Hebrews 1:3 we see that “The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his powerful word.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to see the full article.)

A Little Word with a Big Meaning
(via oneforisrael.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Have you ever wondered where the alphabet comes from? The first two letters of the Hebrew alphabet are “aleph” and “bet”. But it is the first letter and the last letter that are used to denote the alphabet in shorthand… as we might write “ABC” for our alphabet, in Hebrew, “את” can be used: the first letter “aleph” (א) and the last letter, “tav” (ת).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Together these two letters spell a little word, “et” (את), that cannot be translated into any language. It’s basically a way to link verbs and specific nouns, in a way unique to Hebrew. But this tiny word has a special purpose. We can see in the very first sentence of the Bible how full of meaning it can be.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This little word comes inbetween the action of creating and the heavens and the earth that were created. Rabbi Dov Ber explains the use of the word את in Genesis 1:1 in Or Torah,:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
“Et is an untranslatable word used to indicate that “a definite direct object is next” (so there needs to be an et before the heavens and the earth).” The Hebrew text literally reads: In the beginning, created God את the heavens and את the earth.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As “את” denotes the Hebrew alphabet, he reasons, “In the beginning God created the Aleph-Bet. Since God did this before creating the heavens and the earth, the letters are considered to be the primordial “building blocks” of all of creation.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
God created the capacity for words and language. And then he SPOKE all of creation into being with words. Which are formed with letters. Each aspect of creation was called into being with words from God, and today we speak of the the DNA ‘language’ that runs through creation. God not only gave us his word in the Scriptures, but he gave us his Word made flesh, who dwelt among us. And in Hebrews 1:3 we see that “The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his powerful word.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to see the full article.)

165 14

 
 

2017-01-13 02:59:03

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson! ~The old Hebrew word for hemp is kanabus ~Rabbi Yeshua's broad road and narrow path dichotomy in Jewish law ~Betrothal is pictured by vines trained together and intertangling ~Charming glimpse of parties in ancient Israel ~A little zoo of wild and domesticated animals WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson!
~The old Hebrew word for hemp is kanabus
~Rabbi Yeshua's broad road and narrow path dichotomy in Jewish law
~Betrothal is pictured by vines trained together and intertangling
~Charming glimpse of parties in ancient Israel ~A little zoo of wild and domesticated animals
WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

66 1

 
 

2017-01-12 23:12:27

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ It’s Time for the Light of the World to Shine (via ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Our Master Yeshua taught us about the “light of the world.” He used that phrase to describe the crowds who heard his Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:14-16). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Looking carefully at his words we can see that he connects this “light” not only with the Jewish people to whom he was speaking, but also a “city set on a hill” and “good works.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The “city on a hill” is not merely an illustration; it’s an endearing name for Jerusalem: ir al tillah (עיר על תלה), based on Jeremiah 30:18. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The “good works” to which he refers are the commandments of the Torah. Proverbs 6:23 teaches that “the commandment is a lamp and the [Torah] a light” (Proverbs 6:23). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ It seems that our Master unifies the city of Jerusalem, the Torah, and the Jewish people under the banner of the “light of the world.” It is likewise fitting that he called himself the “light of the world” (John 8:12, 9:5) as he taught people the Torah in Jerusalem and throughout the land of Israel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Just as Yeshua used the term “light of the world,” the sages used the same term in connection with Jerusalem, the Torah, and the Jewish people. Some midrashim also teach that the primordial light of creation (that is, the light of the world) was saved up for the Messiah. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ There are four components to the “light of the world”: the Jewish people, the Torah, the land of Israel, and Messiah. Any combination of these things increases the light of the revelation of God in the world, but the full potential is realized only when all four unite as one. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Messianic Judaism is not merely a collection of Jewish people who recognize the identity of the Messiah. We are called to establish and constitute his kingdom here and now—a present-day realization of the promises of the Messianic Era. What does that future kingdom look like? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
It’s Time for the Light of the World to Shine
(via ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Our Master Yeshua taught us about the “light of the world.” He used that phrase to describe the crowds who heard his Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:14-16).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Looking carefully at his words we can see that he connects this “light” not only with the Jewish people to whom he was speaking, but also a “city set on a hill” and “good works.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The “city on a hill” is not merely an illustration; it’s an endearing name for Jerusalem: ir al tillah (עיר על תלה), based on Jeremiah 30:18.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The “good works” to which he refers are the commandments of the Torah. Proverbs 6:23 teaches that “the commandment is a lamp and the [Torah] a light” (Proverbs 6:23).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
It seems that our Master unifies the city of Jerusalem, the Torah, and the Jewish people under the banner of the “light of the world.” It is likewise fitting that he called himself the “light of the world” (John 8:12, 9:5) as he taught people the Torah in Jerusalem and throughout the land of Israel.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Just as Yeshua used the term “light of the world,” the sages used the same term in connection with Jerusalem, the Torah, and the Jewish people. Some midrashim also teach that the primordial light of creation (that is, the light of the world) was saved up for the Messiah.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
There are four components to the “light of the world”: the Jewish people, the Torah, the land of Israel, and Messiah. Any combination of these things increases the light of the revelation of God in the world, but the full potential is realized only when all four unite as one.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Messianic Judaism is not merely a collection of Jewish people who recognize the identity of the Messiah. We are called to establish and constitute his kingdom here and now—a present-day realization of the promises of the Messianic Era. What does that future kingdom look like?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article)

156 0

 
 

2017-01-12 11:59:22

Israeli flag illuminates Brandenburg Gate (via ynetnews.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Brandenburg Gate in the German capital of Berlin was lit up in the colors of the Israeli flag on Monday, in a symbolic act of solidarity with Israel, following Sunday's deadly terrorist attack in Jerusalem which killed four. “I got goosebumps, especially when I know who marched there 75 years ago,” said Avital Direktor Barber to Ynet, an Israeli who lives in Berlin. Just hours after the deadly vehicular attack in Israel’s capital, activists began requesting from the Berlin Municipality to illuminate the gate up in blue and white and by Monday evening, their efforts had yielded results. The German Foreign Ministry explained why it had chosen to adorn the pillars with the Israeli flag on its Twitter account: “The gate is lit up with the colors of the Israeli flag as a sign of solidarity with the victims of the terror attack that took place in Jerusalem.” Avital Direktor Barber added that witnessing the colours illuminate the German landmark provided a sense of revenge or at least victory. “A victory that says: ‘here we are, with all the disasters that befall us, and with all your attempts to destroy us, here is the beautiful flag in the world just a few meters from Hitler’s bunker.’” Visiting the site, Rabbi Yehuda Teichtal, the rabbi of the Berlin Jewish community, said: “Of all places, here in the city of Berlin, in which just two weeks ago there was another vehicular attack, we stand and say to the people in the Holy Land that we stand together with you. We express our solidarity with the families of those killed and those wounded.” "The aim of terrorists is to instill fear, but they will fail, both in Jerusalem and in Berlin," he said. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to see the original article.)

Israeli flag illuminates Brandenburg Gate
(via ynetnews.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Brandenburg Gate in the German capital of Berlin was lit up in the colors of the Israeli flag on Monday, in a symbolic act of solidarity with Israel, following Sunday's deadly terrorist attack in Jerusalem which killed four. “I got goosebumps, especially when I know who marched there 75 years ago,” said Avital Direktor Barber to Ynet, an Israeli who lives in Berlin.

Just hours after the deadly vehicular attack in Israel’s capital, activists began requesting from the Berlin Municipality to illuminate the gate up in blue and white and by Monday evening, their efforts had yielded results.

The German Foreign Ministry explained why it had chosen to adorn the pillars with the Israeli flag on its Twitter account: “The gate is lit up with the colors of the Israeli flag as a sign of solidarity with the victims of the terror attack that took place in Jerusalem.” Avital Direktor Barber added that witnessing the colours illuminate the German landmark provided a sense of revenge or at least victory. “A victory that says: ‘here we are, with all the disasters that befall us, and with all your attempts to destroy us, here is the beautiful flag in the world just a few meters from Hitler’s bunker.’” Visiting the site, Rabbi Yehuda Teichtal, the rabbi of the Berlin Jewish community, said: “Of all places, here in the city of Berlin, in which just two weeks ago there was another vehicular attack, we stand and say to the people in the Holy Land that we stand together with you. We express our solidarity with the families of those killed and those wounded.” "The aim of terrorists is to instill fear, but they will fail, both in Jerusalem and in Berlin," he said.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to see the original article.)

272 4

 
 

2017-01-12 02:44:51

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Chinese love Israeli mix for baking cakes in a rice cooker (via http://www.israel21c.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Israeli dad Ronen Mechanik sent his Chinese friend Piu Piu a photo of the cake he baked for his son’s birthday. Like many young professionals in China, Piu is acquiring a taste for Western-style cakes coming into the marketplace and she wanted the recipe. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ However, she couldn’t find the ingredients locally and – an even bigger problem – couldn’t bake the cake at home since Chinese kitchens do not have ovens. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ But they do have rice cookers. So Mechanik bought one and experimented until he made a foolproof cake in the cooker. Then he sent a prepared mix of dry ingredients to Piu along with instructions. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Within days, Mechanik’s WhatsApp was pinging with dozens of enthusiastic comments on images of the cake Piu baked for a friend’s party. Everyone wanted to know how to do it. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Following a lengthy thinking process with Chinese business leaders, an economic feasibility study and a consumer focus group, Mechanik and Piu launched cake-baking DIY kit UgaUga in November last year with the help of international marketing expert Nir Manor, pastry chef Eran Shvartzbard, and branding expert Mel Moskowitz – and a few Chinese and Israeli investors who saw its potential. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Each kit comes with a small foil pan sized to fit inside the cooker, a packet of dry ingredients, decorations and special tools for making the cake in less than 20 minutes after adding eggs and oil. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Uga” means “cake” in Hebrew. Key opinion leaders in Shanghai focus groups chose this name from a list of 20 suggestions in Chinese, English and Hebrew. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “They fell in love with ‘UgaUga.’ Although it does not have a straight translation into Chinese, the ‘ga’ sound is used for tasty things,” Mechanik tells ISRAEL21c. “They also love the connection to Hebrew. The fact that we’re from Israel is part of our positioning. They know we Israelis are innovative and creative.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article and watch an interesting animation video)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Chinese love Israeli mix for baking cakes in a rice cooker
(via http://www.israel21c.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Israeli dad Ronen Mechanik sent his Chinese friend Piu Piu a photo of the cake he baked for his son’s birthday. Like many young professionals in China, Piu is acquiring a taste for Western-style cakes coming into the marketplace and she wanted the recipe.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
However, she couldn’t find the ingredients locally and – an even bigger problem – couldn’t bake the cake at home since Chinese kitchens do not have ovens.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
But they do have rice cookers. So Mechanik bought one and experimented until he made a foolproof cake in the cooker. Then he sent a prepared mix of dry ingredients to Piu along with instructions.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Within days, Mechanik’s WhatsApp was pinging with dozens of enthusiastic comments on images of the cake Piu baked for a friend’s party. Everyone wanted to know how to do it.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Following a lengthy thinking process with Chinese business leaders, an economic feasibility study and a consumer focus group, Mechanik and Piu launched cake-baking DIY kit UgaUga in November last year with the help of international marketing expert Nir Manor, pastry chef Eran Shvartzbard, and branding expert Mel Moskowitz – and a few Chinese and Israeli investors who saw its potential.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Each kit comes with a small foil pan sized to fit inside the cooker, a packet of dry ingredients, decorations and special tools for making the cake in less than 20 minutes after adding eggs and oil.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “Uga” means “cake” in Hebrew. Key opinion leaders in Shanghai focus groups chose this name from a list of 20 suggestions in Chinese, English and Hebrew.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
“They fell in love with ‘UgaUga.’ Although it does not have a straight translation into Chinese, the ‘ga’ sound is used for tasty things,” Mechanik tells ISRAEL21c. “They also love the connection to Hebrew. The fact that we’re from Israel is part of our positioning. They know we Israelis are innovative and creative.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article and watch an interesting animation video)

89 2

 
 

2017-01-11 11:16:49

 

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