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⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Money Sabbath (via ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This coming Sabbath is Shabbat Shekalim, meaning “Sabbath of the Shekels” or “The Money Sabbath.” It refers to a custom in the days of the apostles. When the Temple still stood, at the beginning of the month of Adar, the Sanhedrin sent messengers out to every town in the land of Israel, reminding every male twenty years of age or older to pay the half-shekel poll tax. The half-shekel was due by the end of Adar. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ At the beginning of Nisan (the next month), the priesthood used the collected money to purchase flocks for the coming year’s sacrifices. This system allowed everyone to have a share in the daily sacrifices. Everyone was represented before God, and everyone had a share in the mitzvah because, when the priests offered a lamb for the burnt offering, that lamb belonged to everyone in Israel. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ By collecting the half-shekel one month in advance, the Sanhedrin ensured that the new flock of animals sacrificed from the beginning of the month of Nisan would be paid for with the new shekels. If there was any extra money left over after the sacrifices were purchased, the priests applied the surplus funds to the maintenance of the Temple. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Matthew 17:24-27 records a story about the Master and the half-shekel. The collectors came to Capernaum and asked Peter, “Does your Master pay the half-shekel or not?” In Messianic synagogues, we read this story on Shabbat Shekalim. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Since the destruction of the Temple, the half-shekel tax is no longer collected, but the synagogue reading cycle still retains these special readings. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ How can we honor Shabbat Shekalim today? Jewish tradition encourages us to remember the half-shekel tax by increasing gifts to charitable causes during the month of Adar, that is, during the time when the half-shekel used to be collected. By giving a little bit more than normal to the poor, the needy, and to kingdom ministries during the month of Adar, we remember the days when God’s house stood in Jerusalem and we hasten the day when he will dwell in it again. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Money Sabbath
(via ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This coming Sabbath is Shabbat Shekalim, meaning “Sabbath of the Shekels” or “The Money Sabbath.” It refers to a custom in the days of the apostles. When the Temple still stood, at the beginning of the month of Adar, the Sanhedrin sent messengers out to every town in the land of Israel, reminding every male twenty years of age or older to pay the half-shekel poll tax. The half-shekel was due by the end of Adar.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
At the beginning of Nisan (the next month), the priesthood used the collected money to purchase flocks for the coming year’s sacrifices. This system allowed everyone to have a share in the daily sacrifices. Everyone was represented before God, and everyone had a share in the mitzvah because, when the priests offered a lamb for the burnt offering, that lamb belonged to everyone in Israel.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
By collecting the half-shekel one month in advance, the Sanhedrin ensured that the new flock of animals sacrificed from the beginning of the month of Nisan would be paid for with the new shekels. If there was any extra money left over after the sacrifices were purchased, the priests applied the surplus funds to the maintenance of the Temple.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Matthew 17:24-27 records a story about the Master and the half-shekel. The collectors came to Capernaum and asked Peter, “Does your Master pay the half-shekel or not?” In Messianic synagogues, we read this story on Shabbat Shekalim.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Since the destruction of the Temple, the half-shekel tax is no longer collected, but the synagogue reading cycle still retains these special readings.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
How can we honor Shabbat Shekalim today? Jewish tradition encourages us to remember the half-shekel tax by increasing gifts to charitable causes during the month of Adar, that is, during the time when the half-shekel used to be collected. By giving a little bit more than normal to the poor, the needy, and to kingdom ministries during the month of Adar, we remember the days when God’s house stood in Jerusalem and we hasten the day when he will dwell in it again.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

157 4

Comment
  • @yayashow (4 h)
    Did they have these taxes when Solomon was in charge?
     
  • @yayashow (4 h)
    Is this the second temple you're speaking of?
     
  • @yayashow (4 h)
    I have messaged you
     
  • @mandiv79 (8 h)
    😍
     
 

2017-02-24 09:24:59

Zion alignment (via kehilanews.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In the first century, the ministry of Yeshua and His disciples were very much connected to time and geography. But as the Gospel went out to the nations, over the past 1900 years, there has been little emphasis among Christians on time and geography. The Gospel can be preached anywhere, and at anytime; the Spirit of God can be received at any time and any place. The Holy Spirit does not have a specific earthly body but dwells inside of all of us. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ However as we approach Yeshua’s return, time and geography will once again begin to take on importance. Yeshua will return physically to a certain place at a certain time. The place will be the Mount of Olives (Zech. 14:4; Acts 1:11). The time will be when the nations attack Israel (Zech. 14:2; Luke 21:20) and Israel cries out, “Baruch Haba” (Psalm 118:26, Matthew 23:39). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In the Torah the feasts are called מועד mo’ed, meaning “appointed time.” In the Prophets, each spiritual promise is connected with the physical promise of possessing the Land. In the Christian view, spirit is universal and timeless; in the Jewish view, spirit is linked to time and space. Both are true. The “two-eyed” biblical perspective is being restored today to give us 3-dimensional vision. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In order to get ready for Yeshua’s return, the attention of the whole world must be focused in the right direction. A theater play cannot start, the curtain cannot rise, and the star actor cannot appear until everyone is first looking at the stage. Jerusalem is the stage. Jesus is the star. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Hebrew for Zion is ציון meaning sign post. Zion is a marker, a street sign, pointing in the right direction. It is no wonder that the United Nations and Islamic Extremism are so “anti” Zionist. Everyone will be pointed toward Zion; whether for good or evil. Those in opposition are called “haters of Zion”). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Alignment is urgent. It is like chiropractic treatment for the “body of Messiah”. When the neck and back come into alignment, healing power and freedom of movement are released. It sets a correct order and pattern for God’s plan. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to read the full article.)

Zion alignment
(via kehilanews.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the first century, the ministry of Yeshua and His disciples were very much connected to time and geography. But as the Gospel went out to the nations, over the past 1900 years, there has been little emphasis among Christians on time and geography. The Gospel can be preached anywhere, and at anytime; the Spirit of God can be received at any time and any place. The Holy Spirit does not have a specific earthly body but dwells inside of all of us.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
However as we approach Yeshua’s return, time and geography will once again begin to take on importance. Yeshua will return physically to a certain place at a certain time. The place will be the Mount of Olives (Zech. 14:4; Acts 1:11). The time will be when the nations attack Israel (Zech. 14:2; Luke 21:20) and Israel cries out, “Baruch Haba” (Psalm 118:26, Matthew 23:39).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In the Torah the feasts are called מועד mo’ed, meaning “appointed time.” In the Prophets, each spiritual promise is connected with the physical promise of possessing the Land. In the Christian view, spirit is universal and timeless; in the Jewish view, spirit is linked to time and space. Both are true. The “two-eyed” biblical perspective is being restored today to give us 3-dimensional vision.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In order to get ready for Yeshua’s return, the attention of the whole world must be focused in the right direction. A theater play cannot start, the curtain cannot rise, and the star actor cannot appear until everyone is first looking at the stage. Jerusalem is the stage. Jesus is the star.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Hebrew for Zion is ציון meaning sign post. Zion is a marker, a street sign, pointing in the right direction. It is no wonder that the United Nations and Islamic Extremism are so “anti” Zionist. Everyone will be pointed toward Zion; whether for good or evil. Those in opposition are called “haters of Zion”).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Alignment is urgent. It is like chiropractic treatment for the “body of Messiah”. When the neck and back come into alignment, healing power and freedom of movement are released. It sets a correct order and pattern for God’s plan.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to read the full article.)

170 4

Comment
  • @lilbitsy1974 (8 h)
    Amen... HIS time is near.
     
  • Beautiful
     
  • @isaac.garuz (21 h)
    Amazing... the moed that announce his return is Yom Teruah 🌑 🔜🌙 🎺🎶 ...we are waiting to hear that shofar sound. HalleluYAH!!!
     
  • @pjmccracken70 (21 h)
    Well said
     
 

2017-02-24 02:33:46

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson! ~Why do Messianic Jews say immerse instead of baptize? ~Is it true that Judaism is legalistic and focused on externals? ~What does it mean that Jesus is our Rabbi? Like teacher? ~This Hebrew wordplay in the New Testament will make you cry ~Discipleship is all about your lifestyle and habits, here's why WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson!
~Why do Messianic Jews say immerse instead of baptize?
~Is it true that Judaism is legalistic and focused on externals?
~What does it mean that Jesus is our Rabbi? Like teacher?
~This Hebrew wordplay in the New Testament will make you cry
~Discipleship is all about your lifestyle and habits, here's why
WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

64 1

Comment
 

2017-02-23 23:36:57

Shalom, Jonathan here! Watch our newest "fun emoji Hebrew Scriptures" lesson reading through Genesis 33:17 by clicking through our bio link to this post on our Facebook page! See you there! ❤

Shalom, Jonathan here! Watch our newest "fun emoji Hebrew Scriptures" lesson reading through Genesis 33:17 by clicking through our bio link to this post on our Facebook page! See you there!
❤

75 0

 
 

2017-02-23 18:01:28

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Torah portion Mishpatim, Exodus 21:1-24:18 Ascending the Mountain (via www.myjewishlearning.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Commentary on Parshat Mishpatim, Exodus 21:1-24:18 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In Mishpatim, God invites Moses to “ascend to God” (Exodus 24:1) with his brother Aaron, Aaron’s sons Nadav and Abihu, and the 70 elders of Israel. They do so and, the Torah tells us, they “saw the God of Israel; under God’s feet there was the very likeness of sapphire brickwork, like the very sky for purity… they beheld God, and they ate and drank” (Exodus 24:10-11). It’s an amazing thing, really — they saw God! They had a snack with God! They beheld the divine in a heavenly vision of brilliant sapphire blue! This is the peak religious experience, is it not? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ And yet. After the communal vision of God, Moses continued up the mountain. He stayed there for 40 days and 40 nights, and he neither ate nor drank, because the experience wasn’t about his own pleasure. Moses’ entourage had come with him, but only partway up the mountain. Moses himself ascended higher. He went up into a place not about visions, but about commandments, into a place not about experiences, but about covenant. It is here that he accepts his and Israel’s half of the responsibility for a relationship with the divine. It’s not about getting something cool — but, rather, about agreeing to give something. It’s about getting a lot of rules to follow. All the “do this, don’t do that” of the Torah, while perhaps more inconvenient to the seeker of ecstasy, is, in this case, on a higher level. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Rabbi Akiva, one of the greatest ancient rabbinic sages, once said that the greatest principle of the whole entire Torah is “V’ahavta l’re’echa k’mocha”: You should love your neighbor as yourself. Holiness is in what we do in this world, in this plane. We serve God most — we are at the highest point on the mountain — not when we feel good, but when we stretch beyond ourselves and offer ourselves to those who need, quite badly, what we have to offer. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Torah portion Mishpatim, Exodus 21:1-24:18 Ascending the Mountain
(via www.myjewishlearning.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Commentary on Parshat Mishpatim, Exodus 21:1-24:18
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In Mishpatim, God invites Moses to “ascend to God” (Exodus 24:1) with his brother Aaron, Aaron’s sons Nadav and Abihu, and the 70 elders of Israel. They do so and, the Torah tells us, they “saw the God of Israel; under God’s feet there was the very likeness of sapphire brickwork, like the very sky for purity… they beheld God, and they ate and drank” (Exodus 24:10-11). It’s an amazing thing, really — they saw God! They had a snack with God! They beheld the divine in a heavenly vision of brilliant sapphire blue! This is the peak religious experience, is it not?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
And yet. After the communal vision of God, Moses continued up the mountain. He stayed there for 40 days and 40 nights, and he neither ate nor drank, because the experience wasn’t about his own pleasure. Moses’ entourage had come with him, but only partway up the mountain. Moses himself ascended higher. He went up into a place not about visions, but about commandments, into a place not about experiences, but about covenant. It is here that he accepts his and Israel’s half of the responsibility for a relationship with the divine. It’s not about getting something cool — but, rather, about agreeing to give something. It’s about getting a lot of rules to follow. All the “do this, don’t do that” of the Torah, while perhaps more inconvenient to the seeker of ecstasy, is, in this case, on a higher level.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Rabbi Akiva, one of the greatest ancient rabbinic sages, once said that the greatest principle of the whole entire Torah is “V’ahavta l’re’echa k’mocha”: You should love your neighbor as yourself. Holiness is in what we do in this world, in this plane. We serve God most — we are at the highest point on the mountain — not when we feel good, but when we stretch beyond ourselves and offer ourselves to those who need, quite badly, what we have to offer.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

71 1

Comment
  • @sergiofactory (1 day)
    La debilidad humana esta en pretender calificar quien es projimo y quien no, gracias por tu post!
     
 

2017-02-23 12:28:51

Fresh lemon grass fields in Israel become mecca for cancer patients (via israel21c.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Each cell has a self-destruct button and when it realises there is something wrong with itself - like having bad genes - it will hit the self-destruct. Except if it's cancerous enough it won't work. But something about the citral will trigger the self-destruct, but only in the cancerous cells...and nobody knows exactly how that works. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ At first, Benny Zabidov, an Israeli agriculturalist who grows greenhouses full of lush spices on a pastoral farm in Kfar Yedidya in the Sharon region, couldn’t understand why so many cancer patients from around the country were showing up on his doorstep asking for fresh lemon grass. It turned out that their doctors had sent them. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Zabidov greets visitors with a large kettle of aromatic lemon grass tea, a plate of cookies, and a supportive attitude. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “My father died of cancer, and my wife’s sister died young because of cancer,” said Zabidov. “So I understand what they are dealing with. And I may not know anything about medicine, but I’m a good listener. And so they tell me about their expensive painful treatments and what they’ve been through. I would never tell them to stop being treated, but it’s great that they are exploring alternatives and drinking the lemon grass tea as well.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to read the original article.)

Fresh lemon grass fields in Israel become mecca for cancer patients
(via israel21c.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Each cell has a self-destruct button and when it realises there is something wrong with itself - like having bad genes - it will hit the self-destruct. Except if it's cancerous enough it won't work. But something about the citral will trigger the self-destruct, but only in the cancerous cells...and nobody knows exactly how that works.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
At first, Benny Zabidov, an Israeli agriculturalist who grows greenhouses full of lush spices on a pastoral farm in Kfar Yedidya in the Sharon region, couldn’t understand why so many cancer patients from around the country were showing up on his doorstep asking for fresh lemon grass. It turned out that their doctors had sent them.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Zabidov greets visitors with a large kettle of aromatic lemon grass tea, a plate of cookies, and a supportive attitude.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
“My father died of cancer, and my wife’s sister died young because of cancer,” said Zabidov. “So I understand what they are dealing with. And I may not know anything about medicine, but I’m a good listener. And so they tell me about their expensive painful treatments and what they’ve been through. I would never tell them to stop being treated, but it’s great that they are exploring alternatives and drinking the lemon grass tea as well.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to read the original article.)

128 1

Comment
 

2017-02-23 02:52:42

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson! ~What was nailed to the cross and done away with? The Torah? ~Three legal transactions Yeshua poetically used to say "you're mine!" ~Here's how Hebrew is all about the great beyond, the other side, and crossing over ~Glimpses of geography and racial dynamics in the world of the Master ~How do barbers, scribes, and God all do the same job? WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

Here's what you'll get in our newest Mishnah Snapshots lesson!
~What was nailed to the cross and done away with? The Torah?
~Three legal transactions Yeshua poetically used to say "you're mine!"
~Here's how Hebrew is all about the great beyond, the other side, and crossing over
~Glimpses of geography and racial dynamics in the world of the Master
~How do barbers, scribes, and God all do the same job?
WATCH HERE: www.holylanguage.com/mishnah or by going holylanguage.com > Learn > Mishnah Snapshots

54 4

Comment
  •  
  • @tikitoon (1 day)
    @tikitoon why are some people sooooooo comfortable in their skin?
     
  • @tikitoon (1 day)
    @tikitoon " not just.. " but rather it is a metaphor.. . all this violence is not happening except in the cube of hearts.. the book.. the light gets in with each page. turned..the skin is worn from study..
     
  • @tikitoon (1 day)
    slayed it. so the dead jew .. was just the banishment of torah. we are in remarkable times. thank u
     
 

2017-02-23 00:05:59

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Seeking the Kingdom First (via torahclub.ffoz.org) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Yeshua wanted to teach His disciples to rely on God’s provision rather than their own frantic efforts. He contrasted them against the idolatrous, non-Jewish world. The pagans prioritized mammon and expended all their energy fretting over the pursuit of materialism: “All these things the Gentiles eagerly seek” (Matthew 6:32). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Unlike the idolaters who consume their years seeking after material goods, the disciples of Yeshua should seek the kingdom of heaven. He told His disciples to “seek first His kingdom and His righteousness” (6:33). After all, “Your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things … and all these things shall be added” to the one who seeks first the kingdom and God’s righteousness (6:32-33). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ to seek first the kingdom? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The “kingdom” is the kingdom of heaven, i.e., the Messianic Era. Recall that the Master introduced the Sermon on the Mount with an ominous warning, “Unless your righteousness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees, you shall not enter the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:20). To seek the kingdom first means to prioritize attaining the reward of entering the kingdom—i.e., the resurrection of the dead and the Messianic Era. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ to seek “His righteousness”? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In Matthew 5:20, Yeshua contrasted the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees against the type of righteousness necessary for entrance into the kingdom. The rest of the sermon describes the righteousness that surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees—the righteousness of God—an application of God’s Torah that internalizes His righteous standard. To seek God’s righteousness means to apply His Torah as Yeshua explained it in the Sermon on the Mount. That’s what the Sermon on the Mount is all about: the instructions for seeking first the kingdom. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If a disciple will set aside anxiety over materialism and instead apply his or her efforts toward entering the kingdom and practicing God’s righteousness, the person need not worry, the LORD will supply him his material needs. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Seeking the Kingdom First
(via torahclub.ffoz.org)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Yeshua wanted to teach His disciples to rely on God’s provision rather than their own frantic efforts. He contrasted them against the idolatrous, non-Jewish world. The pagans prioritized mammon and expended all their energy fretting over the pursuit of materialism: “All these things the Gentiles eagerly seek” (Matthew 6:32).
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Unlike the idolaters who consume their years seeking after material goods, the disciples of Yeshua should seek the kingdom of heaven. He told His disciples to “seek first His kingdom and His righteousness” (6:33). After all, “Your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things … and all these things shall be added” to the one who seeks first the kingdom and God’s righteousness (6:32-33). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
to seek first the kingdom?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The “kingdom” is the kingdom of heaven, i.e., the Messianic Era. Recall that the Master introduced the Sermon on the Mount with an ominous warning, “Unless your righteousness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees, you shall not enter the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:20). To seek the kingdom first means to prioritize attaining the reward of entering the kingdom—i.e., the resurrection of the dead and the Messianic Era.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
to seek “His righteousness”?
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In Matthew 5:20, Yeshua contrasted the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees against the type of righteousness necessary for entrance into the kingdom. The rest of the sermon describes the righteousness that surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees—the righteousness of God—an application of God’s Torah that internalizes His righteous standard. To seek God’s righteousness means to apply His Torah as Yeshua explained it in the Sermon on the Mount. That’s what the Sermon on the Mount is all about: the instructions for seeking first the kingdom.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
If a disciple will set aside anxiety over materialism and instead apply his or her efforts toward entering the kingdom and practicing God’s righteousness, the person need not worry, the LORD will supply him his material needs.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

123 3

Comment
  • @__danadavis (2 days)
    @holylanguage beautiful
     
  • @hwarren126 (2 days)
    Nicely explained, my new friends. "An application of God's Torah that internalizes His righteous standard" -- I like the way you phrased that.
     
  • @sonyamilu_ (2 days)
    Thanks for connecting! I love the deep and rich history you share on your posts!!!! 😍
     
 

2017-02-22 14:38:59

Some of us are like Yitro. We have heard about G-d and we honor Him, even worship Him from what we have heard, and that is enough. But many of us want more. We want that personal and up close relationship we have also heard about. We want the experience for ourselves. It isn’t enough to hear about what He has done for others, we see the ways He has taken care of us and we know that we too are a part of His chosen people. But we really don’t know what we are looking for. Like the Israelites in the next chapters, we come to the base of what we hope is going to be a mountain top experience for us. We are looking for the smoke and fire, looking for something to settle into our spirits and lift us up from the mundane experiences of life. What we don’t realize is that just like them, if G-d were to reveal Himself to us in that way; most of us would run the other direction. We forget that the absolute Awesomeness of G-d is just that, absolutely Awesome. We think it is a comfortable thing to be in the presence of G-d. I know, some of you are saying, “but we are under a new covenant, Hebrews says we can ‘come boldly into the throne of Grace’ and Paul says we are to cry out to ‘Abba’ or daddy G-d.” And this is true. We can come boldly to the throne of G-d, we do not have to fear that we will be struck down on the day of judgment for our atonement has been made. We know that our G-d is a compassionate G-d, and that we have been made to be His heirs through the shed blood of Yeshua HaMoshiach. We are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood. This is the same relationship that G-d offered to the Israelites at Mt. Sinai. ...read more about Yitro by going holylanguage.com > resources > blog, or by clicking through the link in our bio to our Facebook page, where you'll find this post with a live link to the article.

Some of us are like Yitro. We have heard about G-d and we honor Him, even worship Him from what we have heard, and that is enough. But many of us want more. We want that personal and up close relationship we have also heard about. We want the experience for ourselves. It isn’t enough to hear about what He has done for others, we see the ways He has taken care of us and we know that we too are a part of His chosen people. But we really don’t know what we are looking for.
Like the Israelites in the next chapters, we come to the base of what we hope is going to be a mountain top experience for us. We are looking for the smoke and fire, looking for something to settle into our spirits and lift us up from the mundane experiences of life. What we don’t realize is that just like them, if G-d were to reveal Himself to us in that way; most of us would run the other direction. We forget that the absolute Awesomeness of G-d is just that, absolutely Awesome. We think it is a comfortable thing to be in the presence of G-d.
I know, some of you are saying, “but we are under a new covenant, Hebrews says we can ‘come boldly into the throne of Grace’ and Paul says we are to cry out to ‘Abba’ or daddy G-d.” And this is true. We can come boldly to the throne of G-d, we do not have to fear that we will be struck down on the day of judgment for our atonement has been made. We know that our G-d is a compassionate G-d, and that we have been made to be His heirs through the shed blood of Yeshua HaMoshiach. We are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood. This is the same relationship that G-d offered to the Israelites at Mt. Sinai. ...read more about Yitro by going holylanguage.com > resources > blog, or by clicking through the link in our bio to our Facebook page, where you'll find this post with a live link to the article.

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2017-02-22 05:05:58

Who Said to Hold All Things in Common? (via israelstudycenter.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Book of Acts describes the first-century Jewish Christ-followers in a way unexpected to most modern believers. They are described in terms reminiscent of Utopian society, where believers held all things in common and none had need (Acts 2:32-35). This was the ultimate expression of the Jewish concept of Ahavat Yisrael – the Love of Israel held among the Jewish followers of Jesus in the first century. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ But how did this practice begin? In other words, based on what did they conduct this communal lifestyle in Christ Jesus? The Torah, with all its care for the poor and needy (Lev.23:22), does not ever talk about shared property. In fact it emphasizes God-given right to private property (Ex. 20:17)! Neither prophets nor Yeshua himself taught that all the faithful must abandon everything they ever owned. Yet these believers unapologetically lived the way they did. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Our best available reconstruction links this group of Christ-followers with Essene communities that – according to Josephus Flavius – practiced just this kind of lifestyle. In describing them, the Jewish historian writes: “…one cannot find a person among them who has more in terms of possessions… those coming into the community must yield up their funds to the order …assets of each one have been mixed in together, as if they were brothers, to create one fund for all.” (Wars, II, 8, 3) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ If this was a community rooted in the Essene movement that now allied itself with the Messiah Jesus, then their continuation of this centuries-long communal practice would make perfect sense. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our bio to read the original article.)

Who Said to Hold All Things in Common?
(via israelstudycenter.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Book of Acts describes the first-century Jewish Christ-followers in a way unexpected to most modern believers. They are described in terms reminiscent of Utopian society, where believers held all things in common and none had need (Acts 2:32-35). This was the ultimate expression of the Jewish concept of Ahavat Yisrael – the Love of Israel held among the Jewish followers of Jesus in the first century.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
But how did this practice begin? In other words, based on what did they conduct this communal lifestyle in Christ Jesus? The Torah, with all its care for the poor and needy (Lev.23:22), does not ever talk about shared property. In fact it emphasizes God-given right to private property (Ex. 20:17)! Neither prophets nor Yeshua himself taught that all the faithful must abandon everything they ever owned. Yet these believers unapologetically lived the way they did.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Our best available reconstruction links this group of Christ-followers with Essene communities that – according to Josephus Flavius – practiced just this kind of lifestyle. In describing them, the Jewish historian writes: “…one cannot find a person among them who has more in terms of possessions… those coming into the community must yield up their funds to the order …assets of each one have been mixed in together, as if they were brothers, to create one fund for all.” (Wars, II, 8, 3)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
If this was a community rooted in the Essene movement that now allied itself with the Messiah Jesus, then their continuation of this centuries-long communal practice would make perfect sense.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our bio to read the original article.)

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  • @rainer.tan (2 days)
    Yet our Lord did have a little criticism to say about (not the system) but the attitude behind their monetary system. Referring to them as the 'sons of light' He sought to balance their view of "unrighteous mammon" through the parable of the dishonest manager. Commending the dishonest manager He gave the story a shocking twist. Taken from David Flusser - Judaism of the second temple period 1 (Qumran and apocalypticism)
     
  • If their was a Messianic settlement in Israel, would you live there ?
     
 

2017-02-22 03:01:49

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ What’s So New About the New Israeli Shekel? Two Notes Feature Female Poets (via www.tabletmag.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ After much hoopla, the Bank of Israel recently announced that two new Israeli banknotes will be issued shortly. They’re part of a new series highlighting renowned 20th century Israeli poets whose life and work parallel the birth of the State of Israel and the fulfillment of the Zionist dream: A portrait of Rachel Bluwstein (Rachel the Poetess) will grace the new 20-Shekel note, and Leah Goldberg will appear on the 100 NIS. This series—a welcome change from the previous series featuring Israeli politicians—also includes 20th century Hebrew poets Shaul Tchernichovsky and Natan Alterman, who appear on the 50 and 200 NIS banknotes respectively. The planned released of the Series C NIS is late 2017. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ That these two women will grace two, oft-used bills is a big deal, in my opinion, because each new NIS bill is like a mini-course in Hebrew literature and Zionist history. The 20 NIS banknote with Rachel the Poetess (1890 – 1931), the matriarch of modern Hebrew poetry, includes vistas of her beloved Sea of Galilee shoreline, palm trees, and verses from her signature poem “Kinneret.” The 100 NIS bill depicting Leah Goldberg (1911- 1970)—poet, playwright, novelist, and beloved children’s author—features her well-known poem, “In my beloved land the almond tree blossoms” (“b’Eretz Ahavti ha-shaked poreah”) with corresponding images. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Call it wishful thinking. But I would like to believe that these new banknotes could be a starting point to learn more about Israel’s cultural, literary, and historical roots rather than remaining stuck arguing politics. Maybe by focusing more on Hebrew literature and less on politics, American Jews across the political divide can find some common ground for discussion about Israel and finally change the tone of that divisive Israel talk and unproductive political rhetoric. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
What’s So New About the New Israeli Shekel? Two Notes Feature Female Poets
(via www.tabletmag.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
After much hoopla, the Bank of Israel recently announced that two new Israeli banknotes will be issued shortly. They’re part of a new series highlighting renowned 20th century Israeli poets whose life and work parallel the birth of the State of Israel and the fulfillment of the Zionist dream: A portrait of Rachel Bluwstein (Rachel the Poetess) will grace the new 20-Shekel note, and Leah Goldberg will appear on the 100 NIS. This series—a welcome change from the previous series featuring Israeli politicians—also includes 20th century Hebrew poets Shaul Tchernichovsky and Natan Alterman, who appear on the 50 and 200 NIS banknotes respectively. The planned released of the Series C NIS is late 2017.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
That these two women will grace two, oft-used bills is a big deal, in my opinion, because each new NIS bill is like a mini-course in Hebrew literature and Zionist history. The 20 NIS banknote with Rachel the Poetess (1890 – 1931), the matriarch of modern Hebrew poetry, includes vistas of her beloved Sea of Galilee shoreline, palm trees, and verses from her signature poem “Kinneret.” The 100 NIS bill depicting Leah Goldberg (1911- 1970)—poet, playwright, novelist, and beloved children’s author—features her well-known poem, “In my beloved land the almond tree blossoms” (“b’Eretz Ahavti ha-shaked poreah”) with corresponding images.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Call it wishful thinking. But I would like to believe that these new banknotes could be a starting point to learn more about Israel’s cultural, literary, and historical roots rather than remaining stuck arguing politics. Maybe by focusing more on Hebrew literature and less on politics, American Jews across the political divide can find some common ground for discussion about Israel and finally change the tone of that divisive Israel talk and unproductive political rhetoric. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
(Click the link in our BIO to read the full article.)

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  • @damonlicata (3 days)
    I'm thinking of doing an art piece , no worries. Ty and Shalom Shalom
     
  • @holylanguage (3 days)
    @damonlicata Sorry, I don't believe tabletmag released a higher resolution image.
     
  • Thanks for the follow
     
  • @damonlicata (3 days)
    Brother, can you please send a higher def image...?
     
 

2017-02-21 10:35:52

The Story of Flood You May Not Know (via jewishstudies.eteacherbiblical.com) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This is going to (at least) be a four-part series of an in-depth look at what the nephilim are by looking at the word and related words in Hebrew, but also learning about and using four different levels of Biblical interpretation used in Judaism: ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ■ Peshat is the literal interpretation ■ Remez is the non-literal, or allegorical meaning ■ Derash refers to the expanded comparative meaning ■ Sod represents the hidden, secret meaning of the text. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ You don't have to agree with the author's opinions to get a lot out of this. It's more a lesson on how to do interpretation than telling you how you should interpret this specific subject. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ We will post the final part when it comes out. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Go to one of our other social sites to get the links to these articles or find them on the source website listed above.

The Story of Flood You May Not Know
(via jewishstudies.eteacherbiblical.com)
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
This is going to (at least) be a four-part series of an in-depth look at what the nephilim are by looking at the word and related words in Hebrew, but also learning about and using four different levels of Biblical interpretation used in Judaism:
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
■ Peshat is the literal interpretation
■ Remez is the non-literal, or allegorical meaning
■ Derash refers to the expanded comparative meaning
■ Sod represents the hidden, secret meaning of the text.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
You don't have to agree with the author's opinions to get a lot out of this. It's more a lesson on how to do interpretation than telling you how you should interpret this specific subject. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
We will post the final part when it comes out.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Go to one of our other social sites to get the links to these articles or find them on the source website listed above.

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2017-02-21 02:50:22

 

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