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It was by design that lake house clichés were left out of the conversation in this five-bedroom, 16,000-square-foot family home on Lake Michigan, which was recently masterminded by Chicago interior designer @karamanndesign alongside local firm Northworks Architecture. Despite the setting, there are no anchors or nautical references floated throughout the spaces—no walls clad with arrangements of aged rowing oars. “Ashley has amazing taste and is mainly drawn to ethereal, romantic European properties,” says Mann of her client Ashley Quicksilver, who owns the Winnetka, Illinois, ready-to-wear women’s clothing boutique @athene_shop; husband Jeffrey is a private-equity executive. “We started with a classic French aesthetic and landed on something a little more toned down and restrained.” Here that meant sumptuous plaster walls, Belgian oak planked floors, and a sophisticated enfilade that puts the current trend of shared living room, dining area, and kitchen concepts to shame. Even the traditional mudroom (above) was reinvented, with an elevated aesthetic established by a @petersen_antiques console, a Moroccan rug from @oscarisberianrugs, ceiling pendants by @remainslighting, and a bench by @oscarmaschera. See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @jenfernand

2019-02-20 22:59

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It was by design that lake house clichés were left out of the conversation in this five-bedroom, 16,000-square-foot family home on Lake Michigan, which was recently masterminded by Chicago interior designer @karamanndesign alongside local firm Northworks Architecture. Despite the setting, there are no anchors or nautical references floated throughout the spaces—no walls clad with arrangements of aged rowing oars. “Ashley has amazing taste and is mainly drawn to ethereal, romantic European properties,” says Mann of her client Ashley Quicksilver, who owns the Winnetka, Illinois, ready-to-wear women’s clothing boutique @athene_shop; husband Jeffrey is a private-equity executive. “We started with a classic French aesthetic and landed on something a little more toned down and restrained.” Here that meant sumptuous plaster walls, Belgian oak planked floors, and a sophisticated enfilade that puts the current trend of shared living room, dining area, and kitchen concepts to shame. Even the traditional mudroom (above) was reinvented, with an elevated aesthetic established by a @petersen_antiques console, a Moroccan rug from @oscarisberianrugs, ceiling pendants by @remainslighting, and a bench by @oscarmaschera. See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @jenfernand

“I have never-ending curiosity about the character of the spaces that surround us,” notes Cologne-based photographer Candida Höfer, best known for taking large-format, psychologically charged images of architectural wonders—places she calls “humble or proud, restrained or boastful, hurt by history or overcoming their fate, or simply beautiful.” For her latest series, on view at Manhattan’s @seankellyny through March 16, the artist spent three weeks in Mexico, traveling by bus and plane to visit an array of historic buildings, among them the spectacular 19th-century Teatro Juárez in Guanajuato (pictured above). There she made her way from stage to auditorium, moving from one side of the balcony to the other “in search of similarities and differences in similarities.” As always, she worked alone save for an assistant, forgoing additional lighting or interventions to the furniture. “Empty spaces excite the imagination,” explains Höfer, who has also included in the show smaller, at times abstract, images taken by a handheld camera. “Spaces without people lay bare their functions, what they do to people and what people have done to them.” Visit the link in our profile to learn more. Photo by Candida Höfer; text by @cochransh

2019-02-20 18:53

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“I have never-ending curiosity about the character of the spaces that surround us,” notes Cologne-based photographer Candida Höfer, best known for taking large-format, psychologically charged images of architectural wonders—places she calls “humble or proud, restrained or boastful, hurt by history or overcoming their fate, or simply beautiful.” For her latest series, on view at Manhattan’s @seankellyny through March 16, the artist spent three weeks in Mexico, traveling by bus and plane to visit an array of historic buildings, among them the spectacular 19th-century Teatro Juárez in Guanajuato (pictured above). There she made her way from stage to auditorium, moving from one side of the balcony to the other “in search of similarities and differences in similarities.” As always, she worked alone save for an assistant, forgoing additional lighting or interventions to the furniture. “Empty spaces excite the imagination,” explains Höfer, who has also included in the show smaller, at times abstract, images taken by a handheld camera. “Spaces without people lay bare their functions, what they do to people and what people have done to them.” Visit the link in our profile to learn more. Photo by Candida Höfer; text by @cochransh

You could say Rebecca de Ravenel (@rderavenel)’s chic, European-inflected take on island style is the result of osmosis: Born in New York to bon vivant parents, she spent her childhood on Nassau, in the Bahamas, before moving to Paris at age seven. “The first time I went to school in France, I couldn’t understand why I had to put shoes on,” recalls the Los Angeles–based fashion designer, whose wildly popular Les Bonbons earrings and long, flowy dresses have become vacation staples for the jet set. Happily, de Ravenel hasn’t lost her penchant for going barefoot. Her light, bright home in the Hollywood Hills is perfectly suited to indoor-outdoor living. “The doors are always open,” she says, breezily gliding through the free-flowing living and dining areas, filled with peppy floral fabrics, an antique wicker dining set with heart-backed chairs, and striped @madelineweinrib rugs. “I originally wanted the house to be very white,” she says. “I tried, but I just seem to be incapable. I keep adding and layering.” Among the myriad cases in point are antique iron peacocks from her family home in the Bahamas, little black vases found in Burma, and a Man Ray photograph of her great-grandmother Baba d’Erlanger. Pictured here, an antique wicker dining set from @patmcganngallery anchors the dining area. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @amyneunsinger; text by @janekeltnerdev

2019-02-20 15:41

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You could say Rebecca de Ravenel (@rderavenel)’s chic, European-inflected take on island style is the result of osmosis: Born in New York to bon vivant parents, she spent her childhood on Nassau, in the Bahamas, before moving to Paris at age seven. “The first time I went to school in France, I couldn’t understand why I had to put shoes on,” recalls the Los Angeles–based fashion designer, whose wildly popular Les Bonbons earrings and long, flowy dresses have become vacation staples for the jet set. Happily, de Ravenel hasn’t lost her penchant for going barefoot. Her light, bright home in the Hollywood Hills is perfectly suited to indoor-outdoor living. “The doors are always open,” she says, breezily gliding through the free-flowing living and dining areas, filled with peppy floral fabrics, an antique wicker dining set with heart-backed chairs, and striped @madelineweinrib rugs. “I originally wanted the house to be very white,” she says. “I tried, but I just seem to be incapable. I keep adding and layering.” Among the myriad cases in point are antique iron peacocks from her family home in the Bahamas, little black vases found in Burma, and a Man Ray photograph of her great-grandmother Baba d’Erlanger. Pictured here, an antique wicker dining set from @patmcganngallery anchors the dining area. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @amyneunsinger; text by @janekeltnerdev

A staunch exponent of the Italian Radical Design movement, Alessandro Mendini practiced on the front line of what would become the dominant aesthetic of the 1970s and ‘80s. Over the course of more than half a century, Mendini juggled a multihyphenate career spanning architecture, design, and criticism, and designed everything from flamboyant bottle openers to museums. Yesterday, the design maestro passed away at home in Milan at the age of 87. Through his work, Mendini rejoiced in the decorative, the jubilant, the quotidian, and (to many a pure modernist) the profane. As he told AD in an interview last year, “I think that besides being functional, an object must have a soul and express friendliness.” Mendini was born in 1931 to a well-to-do Milanese family. In his own telling, Mendini was destined to design: As newborns, he and his twin sister were nestled alongside hot water bottles in a Piero Portaluppi armchair. At the urging of his parents, Mendini enrolled at the Politecnico di Milano, where he received a degree in architecture in 1959. It was a period rife with revolutionary new design ideas as the country grappled with the aftermath of World War II. In 1976, after a period working for industrial designer and architect Marcello Nizzoli, Mendini established Studio Alchimia, an avant-garde multidisciplinary group that worked across architecture, industrial design, and performance. Its notable members included Alessandro Guerriero, Andrea Branzi, and Ettore Sottsass (Sottssas would later break from Studio Alchimia to form the influential Memphis Group). During this period, Mendini also served as the editor of publications including “Casabella” and “Domus” where these new Postmodern ideas were both disseminated and critiqued. Visit the link in our profile to learn more about the prolific designer and tour his Italian vacation home (pictured here) from the March 2018 issue of AD. Photo by Danilo Scarpati; text by @afixsen7

2019-02-19 22:41

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A staunch exponent of the Italian Radical Design movement, Alessandro Mendini practiced on the front line of what would become the dominant aesthetic of the 1970s and ‘80s. Over the course of more than half a century, Mendini juggled a multihyphenate career spanning architecture, design, and criticism, and designed everything from flamboyant bottle openers to museums. Yesterday, the design maestro passed away at home in Milan at the age of 87. Through his work, Mendini rejoiced in the decorative, the jubilant, the quotidian, and (to many a pure modernist) the profane. As he told AD in an interview last year, “I think that besides being functional, an object must have a soul and express friendliness.” Mendini was born in 1931 to a well-to-do Milanese family. In his own telling, Mendini was destined to design: As newborns, he and his twin sister were nestled alongside hot water bottles in a Piero Portaluppi armchair. At the urging of his parents, Mendini enrolled at the Politecnico di Milano, where he received a degree in architecture in 1959. It was a period rife with revolutionary new design ideas as the country grappled with the aftermath of World War II. In 1976, after a period working for industrial designer and architect Marcello Nizzoli, Mendini established Studio Alchimia, an avant-garde multidisciplinary group that worked across architecture, industrial design, and performance. Its notable members included Alessandro Guerriero, Andrea Branzi, and Ettore Sottsass (Sottssas would later break from Studio Alchimia to form the influential Memphis Group). During this period, Mendini also served as the editor of publications including “Casabella” and “Domus” where these new Postmodern ideas were both disseminated and critiqued. Visit the link in our profile to learn more about the prolific designer and tour his Italian vacation home (pictured here) from the March 2018 issue of AD. Photo by Danilo Scarpati; text by @afixsen7

Karl Lagerfeld, the creative director of Chanel who died today at the age of 85, was a Renaissance man. In addition to his day job churning out numerous collections a year for @chanelofficial, @fendi, and his own eponymous label, he managed to forge a multitude of admired mini careers. He was a photographer, a publisher, a stylist, an illustrator, a gallerist, a director, a curator, a costume designer, and a conjurer of fine tableware and deluxe furnishings—his collection of marble lamps, tables, and more for @carpentersworkshopgallery, created in collaboration with architect @alineasmardamman and inspired by Greek antiquity, made its debut in October. Lagerfeld was also an adventuresome collector and a thrilling decorator, largely for himself, embracing wide-ranging styles and modes for a variety of residences and then discarding them with impressive rapidity by a man who prided himself on his lack of sentimentality. "I like to collect, but I'm not crazy to own things," Lagerfeld once told The @nytimes. "I'm a fashion person. I'm excited by finding things, but in the end there's an accumulation and I want to get rid of it." In the 1970s, the 40-something fashion designer created his first grown-up apartment in an 18th-century building on Paris’s Place Saint-Sulpice, where he devised a black-and-white decor that recalled the slinky days of the 1920s with Jazz Age treasures such as Jean Dunand vases and Eugène Printz tables—which he sold at Sotheby’s Paris in 2003. Head-spinningly, he went through a fully immersive Memphis moment in the early 1980s, adopting the kooky provocations of the short-lived Italian design group for his penthouse in Monte Carlo, only to abandon most of it at Sotheby’s Monaco in 1991. Learn more about the fashion icon’s fascination with design on #ADPro through the link in our profile. Photos of #karllagerfeld’s Paris apartment from @voguemagazine, 1974, by Horst P. Horst; text by @adaesthete

2019-02-19 18:37

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Karl Lagerfeld, the creative director of Chanel who died today at the age of 85, was a Renaissance man. In addition to his day job churning out numerous collections a year for @chanelofficial, @fendi, and his own eponymous label, he managed to forge a multitude of admired mini careers. He was a photographer, a publisher, a stylist, an illustrator, a gallerist, a director, a curator, a costume designer, and a conjurer of fine tableware and deluxe furnishings—his collection of marble lamps, tables, and more for @carpentersworkshopgallery, created in collaboration with architect @alineasmardamman and inspired by Greek antiquity, made its debut in October. Lagerfeld was also an adventuresome collector and a thrilling decorator, largely for himself, embracing wide-ranging styles and modes for a variety of residences and then discarding them with impressive rapidity by a man who prided himself on his lack of sentimentality. "I like to collect, but I'm not crazy to own things," Lagerfeld once told The @nytimes. "I'm a fashion person. I'm excited by finding things, but in the end there's an accumulation and I want to get rid of it." In the 1970s, the 40-something fashion designer created his first grown-up apartment in an 18th-century building on Paris’s Place Saint-Sulpice, where he devised a black-and-white decor that recalled the slinky days of the 1920s with Jazz Age treasures such as Jean Dunand vases and Eugène Printz tables—which he sold at Sotheby’s Paris in 2003. Head-spinningly, he went through a fully immersive Memphis moment in the early 1980s, adopting the kooky provocations of the short-lived Italian design group for his penthouse in Monte Carlo, only to abandon most of it at Sotheby’s Monaco in 1991. Learn more about the fashion icon’s fascination with design on #ADPro through the link in our profile. Photos of #karllagerfeld’s Paris apartment from @voguemagazine, 1974, by Horst P. Horst; text by @adaesthete

When architects @robinnanneystudio and @christophernormanprojects landed a 1976 home in Pasadena, CA, designed by Conrad Buff III and Donald Hensman, they embraced the original architects’ Japanese aesthetic and warm brand of modernism. To decorate—and soften—the interiors, the homeowners collaborated with interior designer @carolinefeiffer. Caroline contributed plush and other elements to create a sense of comfort that wouldn’t emasculate the architecture (and the furniture). “Caroline has a very natural approach and she added organic forms and materials to contrast the symmetry of Buff and Hensman's linear layout of the house,” says Nanney. “For example, she sourced Isamu Noguchi’s light sculptures to soften the contemporary space, emphasizing how their forms were a complement to Norman's own wood sculptures.” The interiors are fashioned from redwood (with the “tongue and groove” method), featuring oakwood floors and teakwood details. “The structure and the exterior have a slight roughness, and the millwork is smooth and refined,” comments Nanney. “The woods and the different finishes create a hierarchy together in a way that the many warm surfaces are differentiated and each serves its own tactile and functional role.” Take a tour of the modernist showpiece through the link in our profile. Photo by @emilyberl; text by @elizabethquinnbrown; styled by @carolinefeiffer

2019-02-18 23:06

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When architects @robinnanneystudio and @christophernormanprojects landed a 1976 home in Pasadena, CA, designed by Conrad Buff III and Donald Hensman, they embraced the original architects’ Japanese aesthetic and warm brand of modernism. To decorate—and soften—the interiors, the homeowners collaborated with interior designer @carolinefeiffer. Caroline contributed plush and other elements to create a sense of comfort that wouldn’t emasculate the architecture (and the furniture). “Caroline has a very natural approach and she added organic forms and materials to contrast the symmetry of Buff and Hensman's linear layout of the house,” says Nanney. “For example, she sourced Isamu Noguchi’s light sculptures to soften the contemporary space, emphasizing how their forms were a complement to Norman's own wood sculptures.” The interiors are fashioned from redwood (with the “tongue and groove” method), featuring oakwood floors and teakwood details. “The structure and the exterior have a slight roughness, and the millwork is smooth and refined,” comments Nanney. “The woods and the different finishes create a hierarchy together in a way that the many warm surfaces are differentiated and each serves its own tactile and functional role.” Take a tour of the modernist showpiece through the link in our profile. Photo by @emilyberl; text by @elizabethquinnbrown; styled by @carolinefeiffer

When globe-trotting writer and fashion-world insider @derekblasberg was hunting for his dream apartment, he was drawn to the idea of unique, intimate spaces. The spot he eventually scored fit the bill. “When I walked in I immediately had a good feeling: I had fantasized about a sunken living room ever since I saw Bette Davis’s apartment in ‘All About Eve’” he recalls. “Also, there was enough space to build an elaborate ‘cloffice,’ a cute word Realtors invented for a closet that doubles as an office, and a Gossip Room, a cozy nest I devised in which to sit with friends and share secrets.” The walls and cushion in the “cloffice” pictured above are covered in a custom-colored tattersall by @ralphlauren. “A small-town boy moving to the big city is the classic American Dream,” says Blasberg who hails from St. Louis. “That’s why when I was coordinating interiors the first designer I thought of was Ralph Lauren.” The cabinetry is painted in @farrowandball’s Cook’s Blue and Blasberg’s collection of embroidered pillows line the banquette. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the apartment. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @derekblasberg

2019-02-18 18:39

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When globe-trotting writer and fashion-world insider @derekblasberg was hunting for his dream apartment, he was drawn to the idea of unique, intimate spaces. The spot he eventually scored fit the bill. “When I walked in I immediately had a good feeling: I had fantasized about a sunken living room ever since I saw Bette Davis’s apartment in ‘All About Eve’” he recalls. “Also, there was enough space to build an elaborate ‘cloffice,’ a cute word Realtors invented for a closet that doubles as an office, and a Gossip Room, a cozy nest I devised in which to sit with friends and share secrets.” The walls and cushion in the “cloffice” pictured above are covered in a custom-colored tattersall by @ralphlauren. “A small-town boy moving to the big city is the classic American Dream,” says Blasberg who hails from St. Louis. “That’s why when I was coordinating interiors the first designer I thought of was Ralph Lauren.” The cabinetry is painted in @farrowandball’s Cook’s Blue and Blasberg’s collection of embroidered pillows line the banquette. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the apartment. Photo by @gievesanderson; text by @derekblasberg

Design legend Mario Buatta died a few months ago, and this project—an absolute plum—was his last: a glamorous duplex in one of Manhattan’s most iconic prewar buildings overlooking the East River. Not that he would ever admit to favorites, but this client couple was especially beloved. They had worked together umpteen times and could speak together in decorating shorthand. They occasionally disagreed about this or that choice, but “Mario would always win,” the wife says with a laugh, “and he would be right.” Working closely with her to dream up these rooms (or backdrops for living, as Mario thought of them) gave him untold pleasure. It might surprise many to hear how frugal Mario could be on his clients’ behalf. If he could reuse existing furnishings, he did so with relish. When this couple moved into their previous residence, only two new pieces had to be purchased for the sprawling living room. That apartment was sold a few years ago—along with nearly all its contents—and Mario was not pleased. “When Mario found out he had to start over almost from scratch, he was beside himself!” the wife recalls. “Most designers would have found this a dream scenario.” The master bedroom, pictured above, is swathed in a @graciestudio wallpaper. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the designer’s final project. Photo by @scottfrancesphoto; text by @emily_evans_eerdmans; styled by @mieketenhave

2019-02-18 14:47

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Design legend Mario Buatta died a few months ago, and this project—an absolute plum—was his last: a glamorous duplex in one of Manhattan’s most iconic prewar buildings overlooking the East River. Not that he would ever admit to favorites, but this client couple was especially beloved. They had worked together umpteen times and could speak together in decorating shorthand. They occasionally disagreed about this or that choice, but “Mario would always win,” the wife says with a laugh, “and he would be right.” Working closely with her to dream up these rooms (or backdrops for living, as Mario thought of them) gave him untold pleasure. It might surprise many to hear how frugal Mario could be on his clients’ behalf. If he could reuse existing furnishings, he did so with relish. When this couple moved into their previous residence, only two new pieces had to be purchased for the sprawling living room. That apartment was sold a few years ago—along with nearly all its contents—and Mario was not pleased. “When Mario found out he had to start over almost from scratch, he was beside himself!” the wife recalls. “Most designers would have found this a dream scenario.” The master bedroom, pictured above, is swathed in a @graciestudio wallpaper. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the designer’s final project. Photo by @scottfrancesphoto; text by @emily_evans_eerdmans; styled by @mieketenhave

Clients of #AD100 firm @ashe_leandro tend toward the young and creative, including actor @lievschreiber, artist @rashidjohnson, @lalignenyc cofounder @meredithmelling, and @coldplay guitarist Jonny Buckland. They also, inevitably, end up feeling like family, thanks to @arielashe and partner Reinaldo Leandro (@reilean)’s hands-on, relaxed approach. In the case of this project pictured above, “family” is just what we’re talking about– the clients are Ariel’s younger sister, the human-rights attorney Alexi Ashe Meyers and her husband @sethmeyers. 
The Meyerses, who married in 2013, bought this eight-room duplex in a redbrick prewar in 2016 and got down to business in order to accommodate their growing family and demanding professional lives. Like all Ashe Leandro projects, the Meyers residence is not a showplace: It’s a home. It added one more occupant last April, when Alexi delivered the couple’s second child, another boy, in the building’s lobby. Ashe Leandro, who are known for making kid spaces cool, jumped in to help the expanded family accommodate its newest member. Pictured here, the office is outfitted with a desk and chairs from a Paris flea market and the master bedroom lies through the doorway. Visit the link in our profile to see more inside the home. Photo by @shadedeggesphotography; text by @mrchampale; styled by @colinking

2019-02-17 22:03

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Clients of #AD100 firm @ashe_leandro tend toward the young and creative, including actor @lievschreiber, artist @rashidjohnson, @lalignenyc cofounder @meredithmelling, and @coldplay guitarist Jonny Buckland. They also, inevitably, end up feeling like family, thanks to @arielashe and partner Reinaldo Leandro (@reilean)’s hands-on, relaxed approach. In the case of this project pictured above, “family” is just what we’re talking about– the clients are Ariel’s younger sister, the human-rights attorney Alexi Ashe Meyers and her husband @sethmeyers. The Meyerses, who married in 2013, bought this eight-room duplex in a redbrick prewar in 2016 and got down to business in order to accommodate their growing family and demanding professional lives. Like all Ashe Leandro projects, the Meyers residence is not a showplace: It’s a home. It added one more occupant last April, when Alexi delivered the couple’s second child, another boy, in the building’s lobby. Ashe Leandro, who are known for making kid spaces cool, jumped in to help the expanded family accommodate its newest member. Pictured here, the office is outfitted with a desk and chairs from a Paris flea market and the master bedroom lies through the doorway. Visit the link in our profile to see more inside the home. Photo by @shadedeggesphotography; text by @mrchampale; styled by @colinking

A collaboration between #AD100 designer Waldo Fernandez (@waldos_designs) and the mother-and-son team of Kathleen and Tommy Clements (@clementsdesign), @krisjenner’s serene, understated house is awash in classic pieces by titans of 20th-century decorative arts on the order of Charlotte Perriand, Jean Prouvé, Jean Royère, Pierre Guariche, Aldo Tura, Paolo Buffa, and Oscar Niemeyer. It’s a dramatic departure from the dynamo’s previous home, which she still uses to tape KUWTK. “I’ve been collecting furniture and making houses for a lifetime. I’ve had so many different types of homes in so many different styles,” Jenner recalls, laughing at the memory of some of her earlier efforts. “In the ’80s, my bedroom looked like a lavender-chintz supplier threw up all over it. Robert Kardashian was such a good sport,” she adds, referring to her then-husband. “Kris has genuinely sophisticated taste. The Prouvé daybed, the Jeanneret chairs, the Lalannes—these are all things she came with. This house was a great opportunity for her to express her love of art and design,” observes Fernandez. In the great room, custom seating mingles with an Oscar Niemeyer chair and ottoman, a Lalanne sheep, and a cocktail table by Vincent Dubourg. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the Hidden Hills, CA home. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @lawrenhowell

2019-02-17 18:19

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A collaboration between #AD100 designer Waldo Fernandez (@waldos_designs) and the mother-and-son team of Kathleen and Tommy Clements (@clementsdesign), @krisjenner’s serene, understated house is awash in classic pieces by titans of 20th-century decorative arts on the order of Charlotte Perriand, Jean Prouvé, Jean Royère, Pierre Guariche, Aldo Tura, Paolo Buffa, and Oscar Niemeyer. It’s a dramatic departure from the dynamo’s previous home, which she still uses to tape KUWTK. “I’ve been collecting furniture and making houses for a lifetime. I’ve had so many different types of homes in so many different styles,” Jenner recalls, laughing at the memory of some of her earlier efforts. “In the ’80s, my bedroom looked like a lavender-chintz supplier threw up all over it. Robert Kardashian was such a good sport,” she adds, referring to her then-husband. “Kris has genuinely sophisticated taste. The Prouvé daybed, the Jeanneret chairs, the Lalannes—these are all things she came with. This house was a great opportunity for her to express her love of art and design,” observes Fernandez. In the great room, custom seating mingles with an Oscar Niemeyer chair and ottoman, a Lalanne sheep, and a cocktail table by Vincent Dubourg. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the Hidden Hills, CA home. Photo by @wabranowicz; text by @mayer.rus; styled by @lawrenhowell

For her clients’ house on Lake Michigan, Chicago interior designer @karamanndesign masterminded a European-inspired retreat. “We started with a classic French aesthetic and landed on something a little more toned down and restrained,” Mann explains. Each room throughout the 16,000-square-foot home maintains a distinct character and enjoys the kind of privacy that today feels like a luxury. “There’s a beautiful formality to the house,” says Mann. “It’s new construction but it feels like it’s been there forever.” The dining room, pictured here, is a prime example, with hand-painted plaster walls in a subtle shade of pink that Mann describes as “there but not there.” Adding to the refined atmosphere is a mix of vintage and contemporary furnishings that display a subtlety of shape and form.The angularity of vintage Pierre Jeanneret Chandigarh chairs in this room plays off the fluted details of a glass-and-steel buffet by Christophe Côme while an Iranian rug from @oscarisberianrugs anchors the room. “It’s a very special house with a really unique feel that’s not at all trendy or of-the-moment,” says Mann. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @jenfernand

2019-02-17 14:44

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For her clients’ house on Lake Michigan, Chicago interior designer @karamanndesign masterminded a European-inspired retreat. “We started with a classic French aesthetic and landed on something a little more toned down and restrained,” Mann explains. Each room throughout the 16,000-square-foot home maintains a distinct character and enjoys the kind of privacy that today feels like a luxury. “There’s a beautiful formality to the house,” says Mann. “It’s new construction but it feels like it’s been there forever.” The dining room, pictured here, is a prime example, with hand-painted plaster walls in a subtle shade of pink that Mann describes as “there but not there.” Adding to the refined atmosphere is a mix of vintage and contemporary furnishings that display a subtlety of shape and form.The angularity of vintage Pierre Jeanneret Chandigarh chairs in this room plays off the fluted details of a glass-and-steel buffet by Christophe Côme while an Iranian rug from @oscarisberianrugs anchors the room. “It’s a very special house with a really unique feel that’s not at all trendy or of-the-moment,” says Mann. To see more of the home, visit the link in our profile. Photo by @richardpowersphoto; text by @jenfernand

Frustration is often the mother of invention. That was the case with São Paulo design duo @humberto_campana and Fernando Campana, who found themselves tired of traditional upholstery back in 2002. Then a chance encounter sparked an idea: “Someone on the street was selling stuffed animals, carrying them all in his hands—teddy bears, lions, crocodiles,” says Humberto. “Fernando and I looked at each other and said, ‘This is the chair.’” They headed to a nearby market and bought a zoo’s worth of plush toys. At the studio, they stitched the critters together into a cuddly mound and fastened it to a metal framework with skinny stainless-steel legs. The result was “a chair that connects with childhood memories,” Humberto says of a seat—and its endless variations—that has come to epitomize their oeuvre. “It brings a smile to the face.” Commissions rolled in: @disney wanted versions featuring Mickey, Minnie, and Pluto. @fendi wanted a banquette of hairy monsters. American artist Brian Donnelly (a.k.a. @KAWS) commissioned one made of his own character BFF. “We started making them for ourselves,” says Donnelly. “But then we wanted to share them with a larger audience.” The results? A limited edition unveiled by @friedman_benda at @designmiami that sold out in days, one piece to @travisscott, who brought it home to daughter Stormi. The Insta-famous tot is only the newest member of the fan club, which ranges from Kanye West to #AD100 talents @francois_catroux and @francis_sultana, who says of the kid-approved piece: “It’s great design in a language they can relate to.” To learn more about the collector’s item, visit the link in our profile. Photo of Donnelly’s Brooklyn home by @jasonschmidtstudio; text by @_h_mart_

2019-02-16 20:32

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Frustration is often the mother of invention. That was the case with São Paulo design duo @humberto_campana and Fernando Campana, who found themselves tired of traditional upholstery back in 2002. Then a chance encounter sparked an idea: “Someone on the street was selling stuffed animals, carrying them all in his hands—teddy bears, lions, crocodiles,” says Humberto. “Fernando and I looked at each other and said, ‘This is the chair.’” They headed to a nearby market and bought a zoo’s worth of plush toys. At the studio, they stitched the critters together into a cuddly mound and fastened it to a metal framework with skinny stainless-steel legs. The result was “a chair that connects with childhood memories,” Humberto says of a seat—and its endless variations—that has come to epitomize their oeuvre. “It brings a smile to the face.” Commissions rolled in: @disney wanted versions featuring Mickey, Minnie, and Pluto. @fendi wanted a banquette of hairy monsters. American artist Brian Donnelly (a.k.a. @KAWS) commissioned one made of his own character BFF. “We started making them for ourselves,” says Donnelly. “But then we wanted to share them with a larger audience.” The results A limited edition unveiled by @friedman_benda at @designmiami that sold out in days, one piece to @travisscott, who brought it home to daughter Stormi. The Insta-famous tot is only the newest member of the fan club, which ranges from Kanye West to #AD100 talents @francois_catroux and @francis_sultana, who says of the kid-approved piece: “It’s great design in a language they can relate to.” To learn more about the collector’s item, visit the link in our profile. Photo of Donnelly’s Brooklyn home by @jasonschmidtstudio; text by @_h_mart_

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