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Today, Randolfe Wicker is wearing a suit with a cartoon Lady Liberty tie and a button of Stonewall activist Marsha P. Johnson pinned to his lapel—accented by a pair of earrings made out of screws. But for several decades, Wicker, now 81, was never seen in public without his suit-and-tie uniform in a much more traditional black. He was wearing that black suit and tie at what’s thought to be the first U.S. picket for gay civil rights, which took place in #NewYorkCity in 1964. He wore it when he answered questions on-air in 1965 as one of the first openly gay men to appear on television. And he donned that suit again when he protested New York’s prohibition against serving gay patrons during a “sip-in” in 1966. Wicker jokes that he looked like a preacher for most of the 1960s—but for one of the earliest #LGBTQ activists, it was a political choice. It was also a choice that went hand-in-hand with the work Wicker did with the Mattachine Society, which he joined in 1958 when he was age 20. The Mattachine Society—considered one of the earliest gay #activist groups in U.S. history—had already existed for nearly a decade at that point, and its work in advocating for equal civil rights for gay people predated the Stonewall Uprising by nearly 20 years. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Sasha Arutyunova (@sashafoto) for TIME

2019-06-25 18:29

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Today, Randolfe Wicker is wearing a suit with a cartoon Lady Liberty tie and a button of Stonewall activist Marsha P. Johnson pinned to his lapel—accented by a pair of earrings made out of screws. But for several decades, Wicker, now 81, was never seen in public without his suit-and-tie uniform in a much more traditional black. He was wearing that black suit and tie at what’s thought to be the first U.S. picket for gay civil rights, which took place in #NewYorkCity in 1964. He wore it when he answered questions on-air in 1965 as one of the first openly gay men to appear on television. And he donned that suit again when he protested New York’s prohibition against serving gay patrons during a “sip-in” in 1966. Wicker jokes that he looked like a preacher for most of the 1960s—but for one of the earliest #LGBTQ activists, it was a political choice. It was also a choice that went hand-in-hand with the work Wicker did with the Mattachine Society, which he joined in 1958 when he was age 20. The Mattachine Society—considered one of the earliest gay #activist groups in U.S. history—had already existed for nearly a decade at that point, and its work in advocating for equal civil rights for gay people predated the Stonewall Uprising by nearly 20 years. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by Sasha Arutyunova (@sashafoto) for TIME

In 1963, when “I Want to Hold Your Hand” came out, Richard Curtis was a 7-year-old New Zealand-born Brit living in Sweden. His parents had the same records every grownup in those days had—one copy of 'My Fair Lady' and two of 'The Sound of Music.' But he had older sisters. And he had teenage babysitters. So when the #Beatles exploded, he was on the front line and his hungry ears took the full force of the blow. Having stepped away from full-blown feature movies for a few years, the now 62-year-old writer of the romantic-comedy classics 'Four Weddings and a Funeral,' 'Notting Hill' and 'Bridget Jones’s Diary' is back with a #movie that doubles down on the nostalgia. @yesterdaymovie, out June 28, is an uncomplicated work of wish fulfillment about Jack (@himeshjpatel), a down-on-his-luck singer, and his best friend and manager, Ellie (@lilyjamesofficial), who he can’t tell is in love with him. After a momentary global blackout, everybody except Jack forgets every Beatles song. He gets to introduce some of the world’s most pure and polished pop confections as if he had written them. “I’ve always felt that what I was trying to do as a writer was to feel like the Beatles in trying to bring people joy,” Curtis says. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @vincenttullo for TIME

2019-06-24 21:49

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In 1963, when “I Want to Hold Your Hand” came out, Richard Curtis was a 7-year-old New Zealand-born Brit living in Sweden. His parents had the same records every grownup in those days had—one copy of 'My Fair Lady' and two of 'The Sound of Music.' But he had older sisters. And he had teenage babysitters. So when the #Beatles exploded, he was on the front line and his hungry ears took the full force of the blow. Having stepped away from full-blown feature movies for a few years, the now 62-year-old writer of the romantic-comedy classics 'Four Weddings and a Funeral,' 'Notting Hill' and 'Bridget Jones’s Diary' is back with a #movie that doubles down on the nostalgia. @yesterdaymovie, out June 28, is an uncomplicated work of wish fulfillment about Jack (@himeshjpatel), a down-on-his-luck singer, and his best friend and manager, Ellie (@lilyjamesofficial), who he can’t tell is in love with him. After a momentary global blackout, everybody except Jack forgets every Beatles song. He gets to introduce some of the world’s most pure and polished pop confections as if he had written them. “I’ve always felt that what I was trying to do as a writer was to feel like the Beatles in trying to bring people joy,” Curtis says. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @vincenttullo for TIME

An empty information kiosk after a conference with Pacific leaders on #climatechange in Fiji in May. This coming September, @unitednations Secretary-General @antonioguterres will convene a summit before the meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, bringing together heads of state along with business and civil-society leaders. To participate fully, Guterres is requiring leaders make new commitments to reduce countries’ emissions. “I know it’s very hard for the Secretary-­General to get 200 nations to come together and decide on one thing, but we need the political will, the political commitment to fight this,” says Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama. “If we don’t get through this, the crisis will turn into chaos, and chaos means the end of the world for us.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

2019-06-24 20:35

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An empty information kiosk after a conference with Pacific leaders on #climatechange in Fiji in May. This coming September, @unitednations Secretary-General @antonioguterres will convene a summit before the meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, bringing together heads of state along with business and civil-society leaders. To participate fully, Guterres is requiring leaders make new commitments to reduce countries’ emissions. “I know it’s very hard for the Secretary-­General to get 200 nations to come together and decide on one thing, but we need the political will, the political commitment to fight this,” says Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama. “If we don’t get through this, the crisis will turn into chaos, and chaos means the end of the world for us.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

A bodyguard stands watch as Pacific island leaders meet to discuss their #climate agenda during a special meeting with U.N. Secretary-General @antonioguterres in Fiji in May. #Fiji marked the second stop on a four-country tour of the region for Guterres, who is working to position the tiny nations not just as the political center of the #climatechange debate, but as its moral center, too. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

2019-06-24 16:11

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A bodyguard stands watch as Pacific island leaders meet to discuss their #climate agenda during a special meeting with U.N. Secretary-General @antonioguterres in Fiji in May. #Fiji marked the second stop on a four-country tour of the region for Guterres, who is working to position the tiny nations not just as the political center of the #climatechange debate, but as its moral center, too. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @cgregoryphoto for TIME

People participate in a #pride march in #Kiev, Ukraine, on June 23. The parade, estimated to be the city's largest ever, has been marked by anti-LGBTQ violence in the past, but a heavy police presence has been generally effective at discouraging direct attacks on parade participants. In the second photograph, officers link arms to create a barrier between marchers and counter-protesters. Photographs by @hoffmanbrendan—@gettyimages

2019-06-24 11:06

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People participate in a #pride march in #Kiev, Ukraine, on June 23. The parade, estimated to be the city's largest ever, has been marked by anti-LGBTQ violence in the past, but a heavy police presence has been generally effective at discouraging direct attacks on parade participants. In the second photograph, officers link arms to create a barrier between marchers and counter-protesters. Photographs by @hoffmanbrendan—@gettyimages

Marc Robbs and his daughter, Tehila-Rahel, two, in the Jewish quarter of Sarcelle, outside Paris. In #France, with the world’s third biggest Jewish population, government records showed a 74% spike in anti-Semitic acts between 2017 and 2018. And yet, for all the grim statistics, there are signs of hope across #Europe. As anti-Semitism has risen, the fight against it has intensified, both among regular Europeans and their politicians. E.U. leaders now describe the battle as one they cannot afford to lose, as though it encapsulates the struggle for Europe’s very soul, writes Vivienne Walt. “Anti-Semitism is a negation of what France is,” French President Emmanuel Macron said in February, after visiting a Jewish cemetery where swastikas had been daubed on some 80 graves. Read more about how Europe's Jews are resisting a rising tide of anti-Semitism at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

2019-06-23 23:24

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Marc Robbs and his daughter, Tehila-Rahel, two, in the Jewish quarter of Sarcelle, outside Paris. In #France, with the world’s third biggest Jewish population, government records showed a 74% spike in anti-Semitic acts between 2017 and 2018. And yet, for all the grim statistics, there are signs of hope across #Europe. As anti-Semitism has risen, the fight against it has intensified, both among regular Europeans and their politicians. E.U. leaders now describe the battle as one they cannot afford to lose, as though it encapsulates the struggle for Europe’s very soul, writes Vivienne Walt. “Anti-Semitism is a negation of what France is,” French President Emmanuel Macron said in February, after visiting a Jewish cemetery where swastikas had been daubed on some 80 graves. Read more about how Europe's Jews are resisting a rising tide of anti-Semitism at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

Attacks on Jews doubled in the U.S. from 2017 to 2018, according to the @adl_national, but the trend is especially pronounced in #Europe, the continent where 75 years ago hatred of Jews led to their attempted extermination. In an E.U. poll of European Jews across the Continent, published in January, 89% said anti-Semitism had significantly increased over five years. A separate survey in 12 E.U. countries concluded that Europe’s Jews were subjected to “a sustained stream of abuse.” A complex web of factors have combined to create this moment in time for one of Europe’s oldest communities, reports Vivienne Walt. Anti-Semitism has found oxygen among white supremacists on the far right and #Israel bashers on the far left. Millions of new immigrants are settling in Europe, many from Muslim countries deeply hostile to Israel and sometimes also Jews. Exacerbated by the Internet’s ability to spread hatred, anti-Jewish feeling is surging in way that experts fear could result in a conflagration, if governments and communities fail effectively to tackle its causes. “Parents say to their kids, ‘Don’t tell your friends you are Jewish.’ Jewish teachers are afraid to tell kids they are Jewish,” says Shneur Kesselman, the Chabad-Lubavitch rabbi of Malmo, #Sweden, who moved from his native Detroit in 2004. Kesselman recently installed bulletproof glass on his office window in the #synagogue, which dates from 1903. He says Jews have steadily adapted to low-level hostility. “We feel so long as our names are not on a list, we are O.K.,” he says. “There is a danger that we are accepting much too much.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

2019-06-23 21:24

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Attacks on Jews doubled in the U.S. from 2017 to 2018, according to the @adl_national, but the trend is especially pronounced in #Europe, the continent where 75 years ago hatred of Jews led to their attempted extermination. In an E.U. poll of European Jews across the Continent, published in January, 89% said anti-Semitism had significantly increased over five years. A separate survey in 12 E.U. countries concluded that Europe’s Jews were subjected to “a sustained stream of abuse.” A complex web of factors have combined to create this moment in time for one of Europe’s oldest communities, reports Vivienne Walt. Anti-Semitism has found oxygen among white supremacists on the far right and #Israel bashers on the far left. Millions of new immigrants are settling in Europe, many from Muslim countries deeply hostile to Israel and sometimes also Jews. Exacerbated by the Internet’s ability to spread hatred, anti-Jewish feeling is surging in way that experts fear could result in a conflagration, if governments and communities fail effectively to tackle its causes. “Parents say to their kids, ‘Don’t tell your friends you are Jewish.’ Jewish teachers are afraid to tell kids they are Jewish,” says Shneur Kesselman, the Chabad-Lubavitch rabbi of Malmo, #Sweden, who moved from his native Detroit in 2004. Kesselman recently installed bulletproof glass on his office window in the #synagogue, which dates from 1903. He says Jews have steadily adapted to low-level hostility. “We feel so long as our names are not on a list, we are O.K.,” he says. “There is a danger that we are accepting much too much.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @magnuswennman for TIME

When Ida Dickens last saw her younger brother, he was waving from the back of a taxicab, a lanky 18-year-old farm boy headed to Korea, a place he knew nothing about. Hoover Jones had enlisted as an infantryman in one of #America’s last segregated units, even though he had never handled a weapon. In his mind, joining the #military was a chance for a better life, an escape from the bitter racism of central North Carolina, Ida tells TIME's W.J. Hennigan. But Hoover soon found himself in a poorly trained unit struggling with equipment that would fall to pieces in numbing subzero temperatures. In a Nov. 17, 1950, letter to his mother from inside his foxhole, Hoover hoped he would be on his way home by Christmas. Nine days later, he vanished. The U.S. Army believed he had been killed in a surprise attack, but his commanders couldn’t say for certain. Last year, #NorthKorea turned over 55 boxes containing remains of American service members killed during the war. Jones' remains were among them. In these photographs: two of Private Hoover Jones’ sisters, Dickens and Elizabeth Jones Ohree, both in their 90s, in North Carolina in February; and Jones lies in honor at the State Capitol in Raleigh on June 21. Read about how cutting-edge science brought Pvt. Hoover Jones home at the link in bio. Photographs by @benjaminras for TIME, @apgerrybroome—@apnews

2019-06-22 16:35

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When Ida Dickens last saw her younger brother, he was waving from the back of a taxicab, a lanky 18-year-old farm boy headed to Korea, a place he knew nothing about. Hoover Jones had enlisted as an infantryman in one of #America’s last segregated units, even though he had never handled a weapon. In his mind, joining the #military was a chance for a better life, an escape from the bitter racism of central North Carolina, Ida tells TIME's W.J. Hennigan. But Hoover soon found himself in a poorly trained unit struggling with equipment that would fall to pieces in numbing subzero temperatures. In a Nov. 17, 1950, letter to his mother from inside his foxhole, Hoover hoped he would be on his way home by Christmas. Nine days later, he vanished. The U.S. Army believed he had been killed in a surprise attack, but his commanders couldn’t say for certain. Last year, #NorthKorea turned over 55 boxes containing remains of American service members killed during the war. Jones' remains were among them. In these photographs: two of Private Hoover Jones’ sisters, Dickens and Elizabeth Jones Ohree, both in their 90s, in North Carolina in February; and Jones lies in honor at the State Capitol in Raleigh on June 21. Read about how cutting-edge science brought Pvt. Hoover Jones home at the link in bio. Photographs by @benjaminras for TIME, @apgerrybroome—@apnews

Everyone knows #Rome is the eternal city, the passage of time palpable at every turn within its decaying walls and labyrinthine streets. The city’s iconic Pantheon—named for “every god”—evokes this continuum of time. @elizabethbick first photographed there at age 20 while studying abroad in #Italy. Fourteen years later she embarked on “Every God,” a decade-long photographic exploration or “endurance piece” documenting visitors to the #Pantheon amidst the dazzling light that floods the oculus, or eye, during the #summer solstice. In Bick’s capable hands, this dramatic, high contrast series calls to mind a complicated dance enacted by a host of unconscious players who find themselves spontaneously bathed in light and shadow, almost as if choreographed by time itself. “It is a one-part endurance piece,” she says, “and one-part preoccupation with an evolving visitor response to the space.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @elizabethbick for TIME

2019-06-21 21:50

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Everyone knows #Rome is the eternal city, the passage of time palpable at every turn within its decaying walls and labyrinthine streets. The city’s iconic Pantheon—named for “every god”—evokes this continuum of time. @elizabethbick first photographed there at age 20 while studying abroad in #Italy. Fourteen years later she embarked on “Every God,” a decade-long photographic exploration or “endurance piece” documenting visitors to the #Pantheon amidst the dazzling light that floods the oculus, or eye, during the #summer solstice. In Bick’s capable hands, this dramatic, high contrast series calls to mind a complicated dance enacted by a host of unconscious players who find themselves spontaneously bathed in light and shadow, almost as if choreographed by time itself. “It is a one-part endurance piece,” she says, “and one-part preoccupation with an evolving visitor response to the space.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @elizabethbick for TIME

The mantra of #Trump 2020 is “turnout, turnout, turnout,” as campaign manager Brad Parscale puts it. Parscale, a lanky 43-year-old digital-marketing entrepreneur from San Antonio, engineered Trump’s targeted online-ad blitz in 2016. “People all think you have to change people’s minds. You have to get people to show up that believe in you.” The 6 ft. 8 in. former college basketball recruit sees his role as @realdonaldtrump’s facilitator. Indeed, he has designed an operation that’s responsive to Trump’s impulses. “He’s the real campaign manager, the real finance director, the real director of everything,” Parscale says. “My job is to build a team that’s ready to deal with whatever happens.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

2019-06-21 13:37

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The mantra of #Trump 2020 is “turnout, turnout, turnout,” as campaign manager Brad Parscale puts it. Parscale, a lanky 43-year-old digital-marketing entrepreneur from San Antonio, engineered Trump’s targeted online-ad blitz in 2016. “People all think you have to change people’s minds. You have to get people to show up that believe in you.” The 6 ft. 8 in. former college basketball recruit sees his role as @realdonaldtrump’s facilitator. Indeed, he has designed an operation that’s responsive to Trump’s impulses. “He’s the real campaign manager, the real finance director, the real director of everything,” Parscale says. “My job is to build a team that’s ready to deal with whatever happens.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

At its core, @realdonaldtrump's campaign is a kind of a perpetual outrage machine. It uses algorithms—automated settings on Internet platforms like Google and Facebook—to place massive digital ad buys anytime #Trump creates a firestorm. The cycle is simple: Trump says something controversial or offensive; that drives a surge of search interest in the topic; and that gives his campaign an opening to serve up online ads. The ads encourage supporters to text the campaign, take single-question campaign-generated polls, and buy Trump hats, yard signs, beer coolers and WITCH HUNT decals from the campaign online store, all of which rakes in voter contact data. Never before has an incumbent President run a campaign this way. “It is a strategy built for the new partisan era,” says Princeton University presidential historian Julian Zelizer. “Candidates are always doing things to turn out their supporters. What has not been tested, at least in modern times, is a strategy in which all the rhetoric and all the policy is just tailored around the turnout crowd and there is no effort to go beyond it.” Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

2019-06-20 18:21

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At its core, @realdonaldtrump's campaign is a kind of a perpetual outrage machine. It uses algorithms—automated settings on Internet platforms like Google and Facebook—to place massive digital ad buys anytime #Trump creates a firestorm. The cycle is simple: Trump says something controversial or offensive; that drives a surge of search interest in the topic; and that gives his campaign an opening to serve up online ads. The ads encourage supporters to text the campaign, take single-question campaign-generated polls, and buy Trump hats, yard signs, beer coolers and WITCH HUNT decals from the campaign online store, all of which rakes in voter contact data. Never before has an incumbent President run a campaign this way. “It is a strategy built for the new partisan era,” says Princeton University presidential historian Julian Zelizer. “Candidates are always doing things to turn out their supporters. What has not been tested, at least in modern times, is a strategy in which all the rhetoric and all the policy is just tailored around the turnout crowd and there is no effort to go beyond it.” Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @davidwilliamsphoto—@reduxpictures for TIME

A “progressive” will probably win the Democratic primary, President #Trump predicts during a wide-ranging discussion in the Oval Office, the day before formally kicking off his 2020 re-election bid. He runs down the competition with evident relish. @joebiden “is not the same Biden,” he says, adding later, “Where’s the magic?” @kamalaharris, he notes, “has not surged.” @berniesanders is “going in the wrong direction.” @elizabethwarren’s “doing pretty well,” he allows, but @pete.buttigieg “never” had a chance. Why? “I just don’t feel it,” Trump says. “Politics is all instinct.” Trump has already smashed the norms of American #politics, remade the Republican Party into his cheering gallery and taken the national news cycle hostage. Can he win a second term on the basis that’s he’s governed in the first, by playing to his base? Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @paridukovic for TIME

2019-06-20 14:13

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A “progressive” will probably win the Democratic primary, President #Trump predicts during a wide-ranging discussion in the Oval Office, the day before formally kicking off his 2020 re-election bid. He runs down the competition with evident relish. @joebiden “is not the same Biden,” he says, adding later, “Where’s the magic” @kamalaharris, he notes, “has not surged.” @berniesanders is “going in the wrong direction.” @elizabethwarren’s “doing pretty well,” he allows, but @pete.buttigieg “never” had a chance. Why “I just don’t feel it,” Trump says. “Politics is all instinct.” Trump has already smashed the norms of American #politics, remade the Republican Party into his cheering gallery and taken the national news cycle hostage. Can he win a second term on the basis that’s he’s governed in the first, by playing to his base Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @paridukovic for TIME

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