time

Get ranking button

TIME @time
Ranking:
# 588
Country:

Wrong country?

Change country

A police officer takes a break from distributing free water in Jacobabad, Pakistan, on June 29. The city of 1 million may well be the hottest city in the country, in #Asia and possibly in the world. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (@noaa) estimates that increased heat and humidity has already reduced the amount of work people can do outdoors by 10% globally, a figure that will double by 2050. “I don’t think people quite grasp the seriousness of the situation,” says Camilo Mora, a #climate scientist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa who in 2017 published an alarming study about the link between #climatechange and increased incidences of deadly heat waves. “An entire set of livelihoods depends on being outside. Imagine being a construction worker who can’t work for two months of the year.” Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-13 22:25

4822 31

 

A police officer takes a break from distributing free water in Jacobabad, Pakistan, on June 29. The city of 1 million may well be the hottest city in the country, in #Asia and possibly in the world. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (@noaa) estimates that increased heat and humidity has already reduced the amount of work people can do outdoors by 10% globally, a figure that will double by 2050. “I don’t think people quite grasp the seriousness of the situation,” says Camilo Mora, a #climate scientist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa who in 2017 published an alarming study about the link between #climatechange and increased incidences of deadly heat waves. “An entire set of livelihoods depends on being outside. Imagine being a construction worker who can’t work for two months of the year.” Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

During the summer months, the Pakistani airwaves are full of public-service announcements warning residents about the dangers of heat, symptoms of heat exhaustion, and how to take precautions. Hospitals have dedicated wards for treating heat victims, and packets of oral rehydration salts can be found at any convenience-store cash register, next to the candy. In this photograph, a range of activities happens at night in Jacobabad on June 27: a girl returns home with groceries; a boy rides a bicycle; and a father and son ride home on a motorcycle. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-13 01:30

6536 57

 

During the summer months, the Pakistani airwaves are full of public-service announcements warning residents about the dangers of heat, symptoms of heat exhaustion, and how to take precautions. Hospitals have dedicated wards for treating heat victims, and packets of oral rehydration salts can be found at any convenience-store cash register, next to the candy. In this photograph, a range of activities happens at night in Jacobabad on June 27: a girl returns home with groceries; a boy rides a bicycle; and a father and son ride home on a motorcycle. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

While Pakistanis regularly claim Jacobabad as the hottest city in the world, it depends on how you measure it. Various atmospheric-science organizations use different metrics, and record-breaking highs have ping-ponged between Iran, Pakistan and Kuwait over the past couple of years. After extensive research, the World Meteorological Organization announced earlier this year that Turbat, Pakistan, 900 km (560 miles) to the southwest, could claim the title with a temperature of 53.7°C (128.7°F) on May 28, 2017. Jacobabad may very well win the endurance round, though, regularly surpassing 50°C (122°F) in the #summer months. In this photograph, life still goes on without air conditioning at a Jacobabad #fitness center on June 29. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-12 23:50

10848 69

 

While Pakistanis regularly claim Jacobabad as the hottest city in the world, it depends on how you measure it. Various atmospheric-science organizations use different metrics, and record-breaking highs have ping-ponged between Iran, Pakistan and Kuwait over the past couple of years. After extensive research, the World Meteorological Organization announced earlier this year that Turbat, Pakistan, 900 km (560 miles) to the southwest, could claim the title with a temperature of 53.7°C (128.7°F) on May 28, 2017. Jacobabad may very well win the endurance round, though, regularly surpassing 50°C (122°F) in the #summer months. In this photograph, life still goes on without air conditioning at a Jacobabad #fitness center on June 29. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

“If you want to report on heat, this is the right place to be,” Anees, a security guard working for @arynebaker’s hosts in Jacobabad, cheerfully informed her as she arrived on a scalding June afternoon. Pakistan holds the heat record for #Asia, he says proudly, though he has heard that it gets hotter elsewhere. It does, but the world’s highest recorded temperatures—in California’s Death Valley, for example—usually occur far from human habitation. Urban enclaves, where dense construction, a lack of green space and traffic congestion combine to create a heat-island effect, are rapidly catching up. In this photograph, Akhtar Ali takes an impromptu shower at a water tank in Jacobabad on June 28. He sells water across the city from his donkey cart. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-12 22:31

9759 49

 

“If you want to report on heat, this is the right place to be,” Anees, a security guard working for @arynebaker’s hosts in Jacobabad, cheerfully informed her as she arrived on a scalding June afternoon. Pakistan holds the heat record for #Asia, he says proudly, though he has heard that it gets hotter elsewhere. It does, but the world’s highest recorded temperatures—in California’s Death Valley, for example—usually occur far from human habitation. Urban enclaves, where dense construction, a lack of green space and traffic congestion combine to create a heat-island effect, are rapidly catching up. In this photograph, Akhtar Ali takes an impromptu shower at a water tank in Jacobabad on June 28. He sells water across the city from his donkey cart. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

Most days, the Pakistani city of Jacobabad suffers from power outages that can last as long as 12 hours. Even when there is electricity, few households can afford an air conditioner. Locals rely on traditional remedies, like thadel, a supposedly cooling tonic made from ground poppy seeds mixed with spices, rose-flavored syrup and iced water. They also dress right for the weather, the women wearing shalwar kameez suits made of cotton lawn, a light, airy fabric. The loose trousers billow out from the waist, the long-sleeved tunic protects the arms, and a scarf covers the head. The men wear something similar, though without the vibrant patterns. In these photographs, customers are seen at a roadside shop selling thadel on the outskirts of Jacobabad on June 27, and police serve punch to locals to prevent heatstroke on the hottest days. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photographs by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-12 21:19

8641 50

 

Most days, the Pakistani city of Jacobabad suffers from power outages that can last as long as 12 hours. Even when there is electricity, few households can afford an air conditioner. Locals rely on traditional remedies, like thadel, a supposedly cooling tonic made from ground poppy seeds mixed with spices, rose-flavored syrup and iced water. They also dress right for the weather, the women wearing shalwar kameez suits made of cotton lawn, a light, airy fabric. The loose trousers billow out from the waist, the long-sleeved tunic protects the arms, and a scarf covers the head. The men wear something similar, though without the vibrant patterns. In these photographs, customers are seen at a roadside shop selling thadel on the outskirts of Jacobabad on June 27, and police serve punch to locals to prevent heatstroke on the hottest days. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photographs by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

When @arynebaker visited the Pakistani city of Jacobabad in June, in the days after it reached 51.1°C (124°F), 60-something Mohammad Ayub recommended taking frequent rests under a tree to help beat the heat. The only problem is that most of the trees in the area have been chopped down for firewood. “Sometimes, when it gets above 52°, I feel like my brain is rolling around in my head,” he says, noting that it was never that hot when he was a child. “We had more trees then. Now the trees are gone.” To avoid the heat, tractor drivers in this largely agricultural area till the fields at night and farmers take breaks from noon to 3, but if life stopped every time the temperature surpassed 40°C (104°F), nothing would ever get done. “Even when it’s 52°C to 53°C, we work,” says Mai Latifan Khatoom, a young woman working in a nearby field. In these photographs, a farmer checks on his wheat, which is covered in a thin layer of dry mud to protect it from drying in the heat, on June 27, and a boy waits for customers to play pool. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photographs by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-12 18:14

9616 43

 

When @arynebaker visited the Pakistani city of Jacobabad in June, in the days after it reached 51.1°C (124°F), 60-something Mohammad Ayub recommended taking frequent rests under a tree to help beat the heat. The only problem is that most of the trees in the area have been chopped down for firewood. “Sometimes, when it gets above 52°, I feel like my brain is rolling around in my head,” he says, noting that it was never that hot when he was a child. “We had more trees then. Now the trees are gone.” To avoid the heat, tractor drivers in this largely agricultural area till the fields at night and farmers take breaks from noon to 3, but if life stopped every time the temperature surpassed 40°C (104°F), nothing would ever get done. “Even when it’s 52°C to 53°C, we work,” says Mai Latifan Khatoom, a young woman working in a nearby field. In these photographs, a farmer checks on his wheat, which is covered in a thin layer of dry mud to protect it from drying in the heat, on June 27, and a boy waits for customers to play pool. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photographs by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

Jacobabad may well be the hottest city in Pakistan, in #Asia and possibly in the world. The week before our correspondent @arynebaker arrived in June, the city had reached a scorching 51.1°C (124°F). If the planet continues warming at an accelerated rate, it won’t be just the 1 million people of Jacobabad who live through 50°C summers. Everyone will. Heat waves blistered countries across the northern hemisphere this #summer. In July, all-time heat records were topped in Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Wildfires raged in the Arctic, and Greenland’s ice sheet melted at a record rate. Globally, July was the hottest month ever recorded. Scientists estimate the probable increase in global average temperature will be at least 3°C by the end of the 21st century. In this photograph on June 29, ice sellers in Jacobabad offer one of the few ways to stay cool. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

2019-09-12 16:55

9498 59

 

Jacobabad may well be the hottest city in Pakistan, in #Asia and possibly in the world. The week before our correspondent @arynebaker arrived in June, the city had reached a scorching 51.1°C (124°F). If the planet continues warming at an accelerated rate, it won’t be just the 1 million people of Jacobabad who live through 50°C summers. Everyone will. Heat waves blistered countries across the northern hemisphere this #summer. In July, all-time heat records were topped in Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands. Wildfires raged in the Arctic, and Greenland’s ice sheet melted at a record rate. Globally, July was the hottest month ever recorded. Scientists estimate the probable increase in global average temperature will be at least 3°C by the end of the 21st century. In this photograph on June 29, ice sellers in Jacobabad offer one of the few ways to stay cool. Read more about our overheated future, and see more pictures from #Pakistan, at the link in bio. Photograph by Matthieu Paley (@paleyphoto) for TIME

Three decades from now, we will be on the cusp of 2050, the year by which we must have already acted—with urgency as outlined by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—to have any chance of keeping average #globalwarming to 1.5°C above 19th century levels. That is the line above which scientists agree that the effects of #climatechange—extreme weather, rising seas, wildfires, a deepening refugee crisis—will be even more disastrous, writes Edward Felsenthal, Editor-in-Chief and CEO of TIME. Our intent with this issue is to send a clear message: we need to act fast, and we can. As TIME did 30 years ago, we’ve assembled some of the world’s most influential voices on climate to lay a path forward, from former Vice President @algore to the African activist Graça Machel to Chinese environmentalist Ma Jun. And there is deep reporting from every continent on the planet. Correspondent @themattsandy and photographer @sebastianliste journeyed thousands of miles by road, boat and small plane to the front lines of #Amazon deforestation. @arynebaker and photographer @janehahn visited the Great Green Wall of #Africa, an $8 billion agricultural project to transform the lives of millions of people. Aryn and photographer @matthieupaley also ventured to one of the hottest cities on earth: Jacobabad, #Pakistan. Notably, what you will not find in this issue are climate-change skeptics. Core to our mission is bringing together diverse perspectives. Experts can and should debate the best route to mitigating the effects of climate change, but there is no serious doubt that those effects are real. We are witnessing them right in front of us. The science on global warming is settled. There isn’t another side, and there isn’t another moment. Read more about our new issue—2050: The Fight for Earth—at the link in bio. Video by @sebastianliste—@noorimages for TIME, Adil Shahryar and @arpane

2019-09-12 15:42

19830 272

 

Three decades from now, we will be on the cusp of 2050, the year by which we must have already acted—with urgency as outlined by the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—to have any chance of keeping average #globalwarming to 1.5°C above 19th century levels. That is the line above which scientists agree that the effects of #climatechange—extreme weather, rising seas, wildfires, a deepening refugee crisis—will be even more disastrous, writes Edward Felsenthal, Editor-in-Chief and CEO of TIME. Our intent with this issue is to send a clear message: we need to act fast, and we can. As TIME did 30 years ago, we’ve assembled some of the world’s most influential voices on climate to lay a path forward, from former Vice President @algore to the African activist Graça Machel to Chinese environmentalist Ma Jun. And there is deep reporting from every continent on the planet. Correspondent @themattsandy and photographer @sebastianliste journeyed thousands of miles by road, boat and small plane to the front lines of #Amazon deforestation. @arynebaker and photographer @janehahn visited the Great Green Wall of #Africa, an $8 billion agricultural project to transform the lives of millions of people. Aryn and photographer @matthieupaley also ventured to one of the hottest cities on earth: Jacobabad, #Pakistan. Notably, what you will not find in this issue are climate-change skeptics. Core to our mission is bringing together diverse perspectives. Experts can and should debate the best route to mitigating the effects of climate change, but there is no serious doubt that those effects are real. We are witnessing them right in front of us. The science on global warming is settled. There isn’t another side, and there isn’t another moment. Read more about our new issue—2050: The Fight for Earth—at the link in bio. Video by @sebastianliste—@noorimages for TIME, Adil Shahryar and @arpane

Thirty years ago, TIME named the endangered #Earth Planet of the Year. It’s taken that long for the world to wake up to the reality. Man-made #climatechange has thrown us headfirst into a true crisis that touches every part of the globe, and we can’t waste any time making systemic changes to the global economy, geopolitics, and culture if we want life on Earth to survive. Thirty years from now, we’ll look back at 2019 as another inflection point—whether good or bad is up to us. Introducing our new issue on climate change—2050: The Fight for Earth—at the link in bio. Animation by @brobeldesign; Google Earth (Image Landsat/Copernicus. Data SIO, NOAA, U.S. Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Image IBCAO); Sand sculpture by Toshihiko Hosaka

2019-09-12 12:52

12811 130

 

Thirty years ago, TIME named the endangered #Earth Planet of the Year. It’s taken that long for the world to wake up to the reality. Man-made #climatechange has thrown us headfirst into a true crisis that touches every part of the globe, and we can’t waste any time making systemic changes to the global economy, geopolitics, and culture if we want life on Earth to survive. Thirty years from now, we’ll look back at 2019 as another inflection point—whether good or bad is up to us. Introducing our new issue on climate change—2050: The Fight for Earth—at the link in bio. Animation by @brobeldesign; Google Earth (Image Landsat/Copernicus. Data SIO, NOAA, U.S. Navy, NGA, GEBCO, Image IBCAO); Sand sculpture by Toshihiko Hosaka

Nearly every #American above a certain age remembers precisely where they were on Sept. 11, 2001. For those on Capitol Hill in #Washington, D.C., recalling the attacks carries a special poignancy—as congressional leaders, members and staff today wonder whether their lives were saved by the brave passengers and crew aboard United Airlines Flight 93, who stormed the cockpit and forced their hijacked plane to crash outside Shanksville, Pa. To this day, no one knows where Flight 93 might have struck. Morning meetings were interrupted by an alert that an emergency situation was unfolding in New York City—sketchy initial reports grew worse almost by the minute as the morning’s news unfolded from 8:46 a.m., when the first airliner in New York struck the North Tower. Staffers, representatives and senators quickly realized that what appeared to start as a tragic accident in New York was spreading into their own backyard—and that they themselves might be a target underneath the dome of the U.S. Capitol. Garrett M. Graff’s new book, "The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11," is based on transcripts of official oral histories, conducted by both the U.S. House historian’s office and C-SPAN, as well as original interviews by the author and other primary source materials. Read an excerpt at the link in bio. In this photograph, members of Congress gather at the Capitol to observe the 18th anniversary of the attacks. Photograph by J. Scott Applewhite—@apnews

2019-09-11 18:12

13764 81

 

Nearly every #American above a certain age remembers precisely where they were on Sept. 11, 2001. For those on Capitol Hill in #Washington, D.C., recalling the attacks carries a special poignancy—as congressional leaders, members and staff today wonder whether their lives were saved by the brave passengers and crew aboard United Airlines Flight 93, who stormed the cockpit and forced their hijacked plane to crash outside Shanksville, Pa. To this day, no one knows where Flight 93 might have struck. Morning meetings were interrupted by an alert that an emergency situation was unfolding in New York City—sketchy initial reports grew worse almost by the minute as the morning’s news unfolded from 8:46 a.m., when the first airliner in New York struck the North Tower. Staffers, representatives and senators quickly realized that what appeared to start as a tragic accident in New York was spreading into their own backyard—and that they themselves might be a target underneath the dome of the U.S. Capitol. Garrett M. Graff’s new book, "The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11," is based on transcripts of official oral histories, conducted by both the U.S. House historian’s office and C-SPAN, as well as original interviews by the author and other primary source materials. Read an excerpt at the link in bio. In this photograph, members of Congress gather at the Capitol to observe the 18th anniversary of the attacks. Photograph by J. Scott Applewhite—@apnews

In his 520 days as President Trump’s third National Security Advisor, John Bolton, a life-long hawk, had tried to steer the President toward a hard-line foreign policy. As #Trump embraced the idea of meeting with two of America’s most ardent adversaries—Taliban negotiators at Camp David, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in New York later this month—Bolton objected increasingly vocally, according to several administration sources familiar with their discussions. Then on Sept. 9, Trump and Bolton spoke to try to clear the air. Either way, writes @bybrianbennett, Bolton's departure—announced the next day—represents a turning point for the Trump presidency. A blunt, famously effective bureaucratic knife fighter, Bolton had sometimes succeeded in steering Trump towards a tougher line in some parts of the world, including against Iran. Since joining the White House in April 2018, Bolton did away with much of the National Security Council deliberation processes and, in a break with his camera-shy predecessors, stepped into an outsized public role. He used his Twitter account to issue dire warnings in order to keep the #America’s adversaries off-balance. Now, with foreign-policy challenges simmering from the Middle East to the Korean peninsula to South America, the President’s national-security operation has lost one of its most powerful players. In this photograph from June, Bolton walks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem. Netanyahu met with Bolton, and his Russian counterpart, regarding subjects like Iran and the troops it has in Syria, which Israel borders. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

2019-09-10 23:14

12198 177

 

In his 520 days as President Trump’s third National Security Advisor, John Bolton, a life-long hawk, had tried to steer the President toward a hard-line foreign policy. As #Trump embraced the idea of meeting with two of America’s most ardent adversaries—Taliban negotiators at Camp David, and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in New York later this month—Bolton objected increasingly vocally, according to several administration sources familiar with their discussions. Then on Sept. 9, Trump and Bolton spoke to try to clear the air. Either way, writes @bybrianbennett, Bolton's departure—announced the next day—represents a turning point for the Trump presidency. A blunt, famously effective bureaucratic knife fighter, Bolton had sometimes succeeded in steering Trump towards a tougher line in some parts of the world, including against Iran. Since joining the White House in April 2018, Bolton did away with much of the National Security Council deliberation processes and, in a break with his camera-shy predecessors, stepped into an outsized public role. He used his Twitter account to issue dire warnings in order to keep the #America’s adversaries off-balance. Now, with foreign-policy challenges simmering from the Middle East to the Korean peninsula to South America, the President’s national-security operation has lost one of its most powerful players. In this photograph from June, Bolton walks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem. Netanyahu met with Bolton, and his Russian counterpart, regarding subjects like Iran and the troops it has in Syria, which Israel borders. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @yuri.kozyrev—@noorimages for TIME

Uncomfortable truths tend to carry consequences for the teller. When Robert Frank’s book The Americans was released, Practical Photography magazine dismissed the Swiss-born #photographer’s work as a collection of “meaningless blur, grain, muddy exposures, drunken horizons and general sloppiness.” The book’s 83 ­images were taken as Frank crisscrossed the U.S. on several road trips in the mid-1950s, and they captured a country on the cusp of change: rigidly segregated but with the civil rights movement stirring, rooted in family and rural tradition yet moving headlong into the anonymity of urban life. One of those pictures, Trolley—New Orleans, was named by TIME as one of the 100 most influential images of all time. Frank—who became a U.S. citizen in 1963—simply saw his adopted country as it was, not as it imagined itself to be. More than half a century later, that candor has made The Americans a monument of documentary and street #photography. Frank’s loose and subjective style liberated the form from the conventions of #photojournalism established by @life magazine, which he dismissed as “goddamned stories with a beginning and an end.” Frank, who died on Sept. 9 at age 94, was photographed in 2013 for a feature on prominent American artists who were in their 80s or about to arrive there. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @eugenerichardsphotography for TIME

2019-09-10 17:26

10178 49

 

Uncomfortable truths tend to carry consequences for the teller. When Robert Frank’s book The Americans was released, Practical Photography magazine dismissed the Swiss-born #photographer’s work as a collection of “meaningless blur, grain, muddy exposures, drunken horizons and general sloppiness.” The book’s 83 ­images were taken as Frank crisscrossed the U.S. on several road trips in the mid-1950s, and they captured a country on the cusp of change: rigidly segregated but with the civil rights movement stirring, rooted in family and rural tradition yet moving headlong into the anonymity of urban life. One of those pictures, Trolley—New Orleans, was named by TIME as one of the 100 most influential images of all time. Frank—who became a U.S. citizen in 1963—simply saw his adopted country as it was, not as it imagined itself to be. More than half a century later, that candor has made The Americans a monument of documentary and street #photography. Frank’s loose and subjective style liberated the form from the conventions of #photojournalism established by @life magazine, which he dismissed as “goddamned stories with a beginning and an end.” Frank, who died on Sept. 9 at age 94, was photographed in 2013 for a feature on prominent American artists who were in their 80s or about to arrive there. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @eugenerichardsphotography for TIME

UNITED STATES

Top Instagram followed

#100@arianagrande
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/bb68bbed9ffa76fb40a10477f51036b2/5DF8301A/t51.2885-19/s150x150/54511215_1099923480217605_7428801122808102912_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com arianagrandefollowed by: 164474050
#101@therock
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/7b1b08dcfe819834adab5b7c11c71bbd/5E3B3EFC/t51.2885-19/11850309_1674349799447611_206178162_a.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com therockfollowed by: 157220864
#102@kyliejenner
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/cfaa0144f298803e2b3c6cc365b6e08e/5E05FAEB/t51.2885-19/s150x150/66022452_2395621214003429_3467230048979779584_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com kyliejennerfollowed by: 146542235
#103@beyonce
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/a23d66f4d9317db2deaed7ca20df03e4/5E1D63E0/t51.2885-19/s150x150/65422955_2383627718588435_2523680224298663936_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com beyoncefollowed by: 133484321
#104@natgeo
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/39f5dbf3faccf42f4a22b8af880b08cd/5E38CEE8/t51.2885-19/s150x150/13597791_261499887553333_1855531912_a.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com natgeofollowed by: 121513405
#105@kendalljenner
https://scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com/vp/a65ee18ff16e67d4a4c95fd6e3bb573a/5E1C8A21/t51.2885-19/s150x150/69720682_231871377760572_7911205166525710336_n.jpg?_nc_ht=scontent-frt3-2.cdninstagram.com kendalljennerfollowed by: 115873191

See more instagram profiles from

UNITED STATES

MORE